Govdoc Thesis Statements

This inventory lists Microcards held in the Microforms Collection under the Library of Congress classification system. There are scanners available in Microforms to read and make copies of the micro opaque cards . Where multiple cards have the same call number, cards are arranged by author's last name.

AI3. Bone, Esther J. The Readers guide to periodical literature: a study. Thesis, Kent State, 1967.

B2430. Pullan, Veronica Agnes. Simone Weil's criteria of the sources of literary creativity. Thesis, Florida, 1958.

BF199. Chaloupka, Larry James. Analysis of generality of specificity of level of aspiration in selected psychomotor and cognitive tasks. Thesis, Louisiana State, 1969.

BF199. Chevrette, John Maurice. The effect of peer observation on selected tests of physical performance. Thesis, Florida State, 1966.

BF199. Ellis, Peggy D. The effect of knowledge of results and level of aspiration on measures of strength and motor performance of junior high school girls. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1962.

BF199. Gorsuch, Harvey Ray. The competitive athlete and the achievement motive as measured by a projective test. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1968.

BF199. Johnson, Barry L. The effects of applying different motivational techniques during training and in testing upon strength performance. Thesis, Louisiana State, 1965.

BF199. Lanzetta, John T. An investigation of group behavior under stress. Thesis, Rochester, 1952.

BF199. Nelson, Jack Kimberly. An analysis of the effects of applying various motivational situations to college men subjected to a stressful physical performance. Thesis, Oregon, 1962.

BF199. Plummer, Peter J. A Q-sort study of the achievement motivation of selected athletes. Thesis, Massachusetts, 1969.

BF199. Stafford, Beverly Louise. The effects of age and sex on the level of aspiration in selected motor tasks. Thesis, Louisiana State, 1969.

BF199. Stebbins, Clay Benjamin. Achievement in sport as a function of personality and social situation. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1969.

BF199. Willis, Joe Don. Achievement motivation, success, and competitiveness in college wrestling. Thesis, Ohio State, 1968

BF241. Bailey, Beverly Joyce. The relationship of various degrees of binocular vision to a specific test of depth perception. Thesis, Iowa, 1968.

BF241. Cobb, Robert A. A comparative study of color recognition in the peripheral field of vision of participants in selected sports. Thesis, Springfield, 1967.

BF241. Heimerer, Elsa M. A study of the relationship between visual depth perception and general tennis ability. Thesis, North Carolina Greensboro, 1968.

BF241. Hoeffner, Balbina Thecla. The effects of alcohol upon vision. Thesis, Illinois, 1969.

BF241. Herrold, Judith Ann. An exploratory study of the role of binocular vision in performance of dynamic movement in tennis skills. Thesis, Ohio State, 1967.

BF241. Hoepner, Barbara Jane. Comparison of motor ability, new motor skill learning, and adjustment to a rearranged visual field. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1965.

BF241. Viguers, Doris Kimball. An investigation of the relationship of tracking ability to skill in aerial games. Thesis, Smith, 1967.

BF241. Williams, Harriet Grace. The effects of systematic variation of speed and direction of object flight and of skill and age classifications upon visuo-perceptual judgements of moving objects in three-dimensional space. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1968.

BF241. Zimmerman, M Nadine. The influence of stereoscopic depth perception training and level of stereopsis upon accuracy in anticipating the landing point of moving objects in three dimensional space. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1970.

BF275. Day, Phyllis Miedema. Comparison of tactual and kinesthetic feedback. Thesis, Illinois, 1965.

BF285. Campbell, Ruthanne E. After-effects of satiation on selected performance criteria of elbow flexion. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1968.

BF285. Horton, Doris Ann. The effect of gravity, resistance and knowledge of results on performance of kinesthetic arm positioning task. Thesis, Iowa, 1965.

BF285. Johnson, Judith Royce. Measurement of kinesthesis in space orientation. Thesis, Iowa, 1968.

BF285. Lyon, Muriel Joan. Th effect of practice on three dynamic components of kinesthetic perception. Thesis, USC, 1966.

BF285. Pehcar, Gary S. The immediate effects of altered resistance upon selected speed variables of resisted elbow flexion. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1968.

BF285. Sisley, Becky Lynn. Kinesthesis in relation to skill level in basketball, bowling and tennis. Thesis, North Carolina Women's College, 1963

BF285. West, Elles Charles. An analysis of position sense in relation to deranged quadriceps muscle and knee joint tissues. Thesis, Oregon, 1965.

BF291. Carter, Frances Helen. Selected kinesthetic and psychological differences between the highly skilled in dance and in sports. Thesis, Iowa, 1965.

BF291. Cheney, M Kay. A comparison of three groups of skilled performers on a battery of selected tests of balance. Thesis, Iowa, 1965.

BF291. Cleary, Brian. A study to determine the relationship between reading disabilities and balance. Thesis, Springfield, 1968.

BF291. Cooke, Bryan Edward Marshall. The relationship between balance and cognitive abilities of children aged eight to thirteen years. Thesis, Illinois, 1968.

BF291. McCurry, Frederick C. A comparison of dynamic balance performances of deaf and normal college men. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1969.

BF291. McQuiety, Mary. The effect of rotatory stimulation of the labryinth on vertical writing. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1967.

BF291. Nolen, Carlyle A. A study of the relationship between balance on stationary and moving objects. Thesis, North Texas State, 1968.

BF291. Roy, Roch. The effects of normal vision, distorted vision, and sightlessness on balance performance. Thesis, Florida State, 1968.

BF295. Barden, Annette R. The relationship between motor ability and social adjustment of girls. Thesis, North Carolina Durham, 1966.

BF295. Benson, David William. The effect of fatigue on motor learning. Thesis, USC, 1966.

BF295. Bernasconi, Charles Edward. The relative effectiveness of varying information feedback in the learning of a discrete sports skill. Thesis, Washington State, 1969.

BF295. Brassie, Paul Stanley. Acquisition and retention of a motor skill as a function of overt self-verbalization and physical or mental practice. Thesis, Iowa, 1968.

BF295. Byrd, Michael Reagan. Comparison of motor ability of normal and mentally retarded children at the intermediate level. Thesis, Texas, 1969.

BF295. Childrey, Anita M. The relationship of hand-eye coordination as measured by the pursuit rotor and selected motor tasks at various age levels. Thesis, North Carolina Greensboro, 1967.

BF295. Chrietzberg, Agnes L. The relationship between maternal guidance during motor performance and the motor skill of preschool children. Thesis, Florida State,1969.

BF295. Cox, Kenneth Mervin. An experiment in teaching complex motor skills to university freshman male students using continuous and discrete concept sequences with and without instant videotape replay. 1969.

BF295. Doyle, John F. The effects of two types of practice on motor learning at different skill levels. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1968.

BF295. Fulton, Marjorie E. The relationship between estimation and achievement of specific motor skills. Thesis, Smith, 1962.

BF295. Gallagher, James Dennis. Motor learning characteristics of low skilled college men. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1968.

BF295. Hamerslough, Walter Scott. The effectiveness of three methods of instruction followed by mental rehearsal in learning three complex gross-motor tasks. Thesis, Oregon, 1971.

BF295. Higgins, Joseph Ronald. Performance phenomena involved in arresting errors in movement. Thesis, Stanford, 1969.

BF295. Irvin, Melva E. Comparison of the learning of a dynamic and a static balance skill. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1968.

BF295. Leaming, Thomas Wayman. The effects of praise and reproof as a function of intelligence and extraversion-introversion in learning a kinesthetic task. 1968.

BF295. Luneke, Sheryl Mae. An investigation of the ability of the student to generalize selected concepts learned through object projection instruction. 1970.

BF295. MacGillivary, William Warren. The relationship of certain underlying capacities to ability level in a complex gross motor skill. Thesis, Alberta, 1965.

BF295. Marcus, Judith. The immediate effects of altered resistance upon speed of movement. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1967.

BF295. Montgomery, John Miller. Retroactive inhibition and mental practice. Thesis, Oregon, 1970.

BF295. Nation, Edna Earle. The effect of physical education instruction upon movement concept. Thesis, North Carolina Woman's College, 1963.

BF295. Nelson, Sara Marie. An investigatior of the relationship between the real self-concept: ideal self-concept and motor ability of eighth grade girls in physical education. Thesis, North Carolina Greensboro, 1965.

BF295. Paulat, James Gustav. The effects of augmented videotaped information feedback and loop film models upon learning of a complex motor skill. Thesis, Stanford, 1969.

BF295. Pesaresi, Edward. The effect of observation by experimenters differing in authority on gross motor performance. Thesis, Syracuse, 1969.

BF295. Phipps, Stephen J. Effects of mental practice on the acquisition of motor skills of varying complexity. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1968.

BF295. Richardson, Dorothy Anne. A study of the effect of different approaches to gymnasitics on movement concept. Thesis, North Carolina Greensboro, 1967.

BF295. Richardson, Peggy Ann. The relationship in college women of high and low motor ability to personality, aptitude, and scholastic achievement. Thesis, Ohio State, 1965.

BF295. Smoll, Frank Loius. Specificity and delay of information feedback as factors in the learning of a motor skill. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1970.

BF295. Walker, Virginia R. Visual cues and performance of a motor skill. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1968.

BF295. Westall, Karlette Vourlis. The influence of an auditory rhythmic pattern on the learning of gross movement tasks. Thesis, Berkeley, 1963.

BF295. White, Wesley. Relationships of aspects of body concept creativity and sports proficiency. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1971.

BF295. Wilberg, Robert Bernard. The effect of recall from short-term memory on a continuous tracking response. Thesis, Oregon, 1967.

BF295. Wyrick, Waneen. Comparison of motor creativity with verbal creativity, motor ability, and intelligence. Thesis, Texas, 1968.

BF317. Babin, Wayne Louis. The effects of various work loads on simple reaction latency as related to selected physical parameters. Thesis, Southern Mississippi, 1966.

BF317. Condon, Jean Averill. A comparison of reaction time at different stages of the menstrual cycle. Thesis, Iowa, 1965.

BF317. Considine, William James. Reflex and reaction times within and between athletes and non-athletes. Thesis, Illinios State, 1966.

BF317. Eskridge, Veronica L. The effects of limited training in hypnosis upon reaction time. Thesis, Western Kentucky, 1971.

BF317. McClimon, Daniel Robert. The effects of strenuous exercise upon total body reaction time. Thesis, Washington State, 1965.

BF317. Marteniuk, Ronald George. The effects of pre-induced muscular tension on motor performance. Thesis, Alberta, 1966.

BF317. Moore, Claudia Ellen. The effects of alcohol on accelerator-brake response times. Thesis, Illinios, 1969.

BF317. Pistochini, Gordon Arthur. A comparison of reaction time, movement time, and lever length. Thesis, Sacramento State College, 1967.

BF317. Plunkett, Carol. The effect of the psychological components of competition on reaction time in tennis. Thesis, UNC Greensboro, 1967.

BF317. Schmidt, Richard Allen. Motor factors in coincident timing. Thesis, Illinios, 1967.

BF317. Smith, Peter Evan. Investigation of total-body and arm measures of reaction time, movement time, and completion time for twelve, fourteen, and seventeen year old athletes and nonparticipants. Oregon, 1968.

BF317. Waechter, John Edward. Comparison of the performance of selected groups of athletes and non-athletes on a transit reaction. Oregon, 1971.

BF321. Sampson, Orwyn. Attention and learning selected motor skills. Thesis, Oregon, 1967.

BF337.E9. McPherson, Barry David. Psycholgical effects of an exercise program for post-cardiac and normal adult men. Thesis, Western Ontario, 1965.

BF367. Moody, Dorothy Lee. Imagery differences among women of varying levels of experience, interests, and abilities in motor skills. Thesis, Pennsylvania State,1965.

BF371. Carre, Frank Alexander. Increasing torque as a kinesthetically dependent variable in short-term memory. Thesis, Alberta, 1969.

BF371. Selder, Dennis James. Proactive inhibition for a motor response during short term memory. Thesis, Ohio State, 1968.

BF371. Sharp, Robert Harold. Processing demands of kinesthetic information in short-term memory. Thesis, Alberta, 1971.

BF371. Stafford, Judith Annette. The effect of gross movement on verbal memorization. Thesis, UCLA, 1965.

BF378.A75. Bassett, Graeme Reid. The development of a scale to measure male attitudes toward regular physical exercise. Thesis, Washington State, 1967.

BF408. Dorman, Jacquelyne L. Creativity as a significant concept in sport, dance and physical activity. Thesis, Massachusetts, 1968.

BF408. Hjermstad, Dorothy Robinson. Evoking creativity a particular approach to dance improvisation. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1971.

BF408. Thomas, Carolyn E. A comparison of the verbal creativity of highly and average skilled college women dancers and highly and average skilled college women athletes. Thesis, Washington, 1967.

BF431. Coefield, John Robert. Relationships between and maturity, physical and personality measures of twelve-year-old boys in sixth grade. Thesis, Oregon, 1964.

BF431. Kemp, Paul Clement. A study of academic achievement of nonsuccessful and successful athletes Thesis, Iowa, 1956.

BF468. Ellis, Michael John. Proprioceptive factors in operative time estimation. Thesis, Illinios, 1966.

BF475. Briggs, Ruth Arlene. The development of an instrument for assessment of motoric rhythmic performance. Thesis, Missouri, 1968.

BF475. Colvin, Carolyn. The effectof rhythmic training and relaxation on sensory-motor rhythmic ability. Thesis, Indiana, 1969.

BF475. Freytag, Janet Geiger. The relationship of rhythmic ability and background in dance and music to racial and socioeconomic background. Thesis, Washington, 1967.

BF475. Friedman, Abraham Morris. Relationship of a rhythmic motor response to selected tempi. Thesis, San Diego State College, 1966.

BF531. Larson, Edgar Ole. Emotional responses of college basketball players. Thesis, Oregon, 1966.

BF575.A3. Kenworthy, Susan L. A study to determine if participation in sport reduces the tendency toward displacement following mild frustration. Thesis, Springfield College, 1968.

BF575.A3. Laird, E Marie. Comparison of aggressive responses among and between women athletes and non-athletes at three educational levels. Thesis, Springfield College, 1971.

BF575.A3. Martin, Lawrence A. The effects of competition upon the aggressive responses of basketball players and wrestlers. Thesis, Springfield College, 1969.

BF575.A6. Bush, Jone J. Anxiety and performence at three levels of competition in women's intercollegiate gymnastics. Thesis, Springfield College, 1970.

BF575.A6. Ford, Robert. Anxiety in non-competitive and pre-competive situations involving intercollegiate football players. Thesis, Springfield College, 1970.

BF575.A6. McGowen, Kenneth. The effects of a competitive situation upon the motor performance of high-anxious and low-anxious boys. Thesis, Springfield College, 1968.

BF637.B4. Halberg, Kathleen Joan. The effects of selected success criteria of recreational activities upon the observable behavior of conduct problem boys. Oregon, 1971.

BF637.L4. Van Bibber, Edward George. The development of a scale to measure leadership attitudes of college athletes. Thesis, Boston, 1953.

BF637.L4. Walter, Janet Louise. Leadership: considerations and implications for women in physical education. Thesis, North Carolina, 1968.

BF698. Betts, Edith. The relationship of persistence at a physical task as measured by the maintenance of a submaximal muscular contraction to other selected factors. Thesis, Oregon, 1968.

BF698. Brady, Paul Richard Joseph. The relationship of introversion-extraversion to physical persistence. Thesis, Alberta, 1966.

BF698. Clayton, Diane Elthea. The relationships among attitudes toward physical activity, personality, and self-concept. Thesis, Washington, 1969.

BF698. Cross, John Alan. Relationships between selected physical characteristics of boys at twelve and fifteen years of age, and their personality characteristics at eighteen years of age. Thesis, Oregon, 1969.

BF698. Gottesman, Donald T. Relationships between Cattell's Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire and physique, structure, strength, and motor traits of college men. Thesis, Oregon, 1964.

BF698. Jerome, Wendy Carole Foster. A study of the personality characteristics of female athletes and non-participants. Thesis, Oregon, 1969.

BF698. Parsons, David Roy. Personality traits of national representative swimmers, Canada 1962. Thesis, British Columbia, 1965.

BF698. Reynolds, Robert Monti. Responses on the Davidson Adjective Check List as related to maturity, physical and mental characteristics of thirteen year old boys. Thesis, Oregon, 1965.

BF698. Rushall, Brent Sydney. The demonstration and evaluation of a research model for the investigation of the relationship between personality and physical performance categories. Thesis, Bloomington, 1969.

BF698. Seehafer, Roger Wayne. The effects of specific blood concentrations of alcohol on simulated driving ability and selected personality factors. Thesis, Illinois, 1966.

BF698.2. Feinstein, Susan Ruth. The effects of alcohol on personality. Thesis, Illinios, 1969.

BF698.2. Throneberry, Connie A. An investigation of weight change as related to personality traits and activity programs. Thesis, Cal State, Long Beach, 1968.

BF698.2. Trujillo, Cecilia Marie. Effects of beginning swimming instruction on selected personality traits. Thesis, Washington, 1969.

BF698.4. Brown, Edward Albert. A comparative study of personality traits of varsity skiers, varsity wrestlers, varsity swimmers, and collegiate non-athletes at selected institutions of higher learning in the intermountain area. Utah, 1969.

BF698.4. Chipman, Leroy P. A comparison of paricipants and non-participants in intercollegiate athletics with respect to selected personality traits. Thesis, Springfield College, 1968.

BF698.4. Harris, Dorothy Virginia. An investigation of psychological characteristics of university women with high and low fitness indices. Thesis, State University of Iowa, 1965.

BF698.4.Joy, Carol Margaret. A study of the relationship of certain personality variables to participation in physical education. Thesis, Smith College, 1968

BF698.4. Kelley, Sharon Lee. Personality characteristics of female high school athletes and nonparticipants in athletics. Thesis, Iowa, 1969.

BF698.4. Loy, John Wilson. Socio-psychological attributes of English swimming coaches differentially adopting a new technology. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1967.

BF698.4. McClenney, Byron Nelson. A comparison of personality characteristics, self-concepts, and academic aptitiude of selected college men classified according to performance on a test of physical fitness. 1969.

BF698.4. Malumphy, Theresa Mary. The personality and general characteristics of women athletes in intercollegiate competition. Thesis, Ohio State, 1966.

BF698.4. Niblock, Marjorie Winifred. Personality traits and intelligence level of female athletes and non-participants from McNally High School. Thesis, Washington, 1967.

BF698.4. Olson, Edward Carl. Identification of personality differences among male tennis champions. Thesis, Ohio State, 1966.

BF698.4. Riccio, Dennis Ray. A comparative study of personality trait differences between tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade wrestlers and non-athletes at the same grade levels. Thesis, Utah, 1969.

BF698.4. Slaughter, Mary Hoke. An analysis of the relationship between somatotype and personality profiles of college women. Thesis, Illinois, 1968.

BF698.4. Walterscheid, Theresa. A study of the effects of competition upon the personality adjustment of high school girls. Thesis, North Texas State, 1968.

BF721. Stafford, Elba Gene. Single-year and longitudinal comparisons of intelligence and academic achievement of elementary and junior high school athletes and non-participants. Thesis, Oregon, 1968.

BF724. Ferguson, Beth Allen. Personality differences between adolescent girls of high and low motor performance. Thesis, Colorado, 1963.

BF724. Gabert, Trent Elroy. An investigation of selected factors related to consistently reproducing a specified velocity and to perception of change in velocity of a self-projected object in three-dimensional space. 1970.

BF724. Kelly, Colin Charles. Socialization into sport among male adolescents from Canada, England and the United States. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1970.

BF724. O'Brian, Carol Kathleen. The relationship between personality and attitude toward physical activity. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1966.

BF724. Samuelson, Genelle Faye. The effects of a specially structured seven week physical education class upon the self-concepts of low self-esteem tenth grade girls. Thesis, North Carolina Greensboro, 1969.

BF724. Sise, Betsy. A study of the effect of an eight week camping experience on the self-concept of girls ages 12-14 at selected private girls' camps. Thesis, North Carolina Greensboro, 1967.

BF724. Storey, Stuart E. Physique and the self-fulfilling prophecy. Thesis, Western Kentucky, 1968.

BF789.C7. Reger, Joan Ann. Feeling states evoked by colored lighting. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1967.

BT766. Veliz, Dorothy Benson de. Four literary manifestations of the concept of Christ-like perfection. Thesis, Florida, 1958.

BV1145. Cieplik, Raymond. Physical work and amusements as concerns of the Young Men's Christian Association, 1851-1884. Thesis, Massachusetts, 1969.

BV1145. Friermood, Harold T. Health clubs in the YMCA with respect to current status and development of operating standards. Thesis, New York, 1954.

BV1160. Brock, Patrick Leonard. The attitudes and involvement of members in the Hi-Y club program of the John R. Leach, Portland, Oregon, YMCA. Thesis, Oregon, 1966.

BV1160. Kujawa, Charles Cameron. A study of Y.M.C.A. club program and organization for boys nine to eleven years of age. Thesis, Maryland, 1962.

BV5080. Brian, Beverly Dianne. A study of the imagery in the cloud of unknowing. Thesis, Duke, 1961.

BV5095. Berry, Sara Lou. Religious imagery in The book of Margery Kempe. Thesis, Florida, 1963.

CB199. Allison, E Lavonia Ingram. Ways for effecting better intergroup relations in desegregated public secondary physical education programs. Thesis, New York, 1968.

DA18. Ramsey, Julia Havlicek. The foreign policy of the British dominions, 1931-1936. Thesis, Georgetown, 1954.

E98.R3. Budic, Caroline Mary. Wolf ritual dances of the Northwest Coast Indians. Thesis, Washington, 1964.

E99.P3. Irving, John Treat. Indian sketches, taken during an expedition to the Pawnee tribes. 1835.

E176.1. Jackson, Walter Merwin. A study of the recreational pursuits of American presidents. Thesis, Maryland, 1962.

E458.1. Pollard, Edward Albert. Letters of the southern spy, in Washington and elsewhere. 1861.

E487. Pollard, Edward Albert. Observation in the North: eight months in prison and on parole. 1865.

E666. Pollard, Edward Albert. The lost cause regained. 1868.

E842.1. Metcalfe, Alan. The contributions of John F. Kennedy to physical education and recreation. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1966.

F231. Pollard, Edward Albert. The Virginia tourist. Sketches of the springs and mountains of Virginia; containing an exposition of fields for the tourist in Virginia; natural beauties and wonders of the state; also accounts of its mineral springs; and medical guide to the use of waters. 1870.

F324. Patterson, Lucy Adelaide (Holloway). A study of some place-names of southeastern Lee County, Alabama. Thesis, Auburn, 1964.

F590.A1. Pooley, John Clifford. Ethnic soccer clubs in Milwaukee: a study in assimilation. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1968.

F3439.3.D2. Weaver, Wilhelmina Clark. Dance as a cultural trait of some cultural groups of the Inca Empire at the time of the Spanish conquest. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1970.

GN4. Archives of archaeology. no. 1-29. 1959-

GN58.U5. Norman, Stephen Laurance. Collation of anthropometric research comparing American males: Negro and Caucasion. Thesis, Oregon, 1968.

GN59.A3. Carter, J E Lindsay. The physiques of Royal New Zealand Air Force men. 1965.

GN59.B3. Imlay, Robert Curtis. The physiques of college baseball players in San Diego, California. Thesis, San Diego State, 1966.

GN62. Sleet, David A. Somatotype and social image. Thesis, San Diego State, 1968

GN62. Sutorius, Gordon Clark. Somatotypes of United States rowers. Thesis, San Diego State, 1969.

GN63. Herron, Robert Ernest. The constancy of physique in adolescent boys. Thesis, Illinois, 1960.

GN63. Sinclair, Gary Dane. Stability of physique types of boys nine through twelve years of age. Thesis, Oregon, 1966.

GN67.W6. Booth, Marilyn Joyce. Skinfold measurements as an estimate of specific gravity and of the percentage of body fat. Thesis, Alberta, 1969.

GN67.W6. Bowes, Barbara Floruss. The effect of specific exercises on selected skinfold and girth measures of college women. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1967.

GN67.W6. DeWoskin, Sheila F. Somatotypes of women in a fitness program. Thesis, San Diego State, 1967.

GN67.W6. McLure, Carolyn Colvin. The physiques of professional and amateur women golfers. Thesis, San Diego State, 1967.

GN67.W6. Tufts, Sharon Anne. The effects of diet and physical activity on selected measures of college women. Thesis, Iowa, 1969.

GN67.W6. Westlake, Doris Joan. Somatotypes of female track and field competitors. Thesis, San Diego State, 1967.

GN231. Fullilove, Margaret Ann. A critical analysis of the problems encountered in posture research. Thesis, North Carolina Greensboro, 1969.

GN231. Heisal, William A. An investigation into human head balance. Thesis, Michigan, 1958.

GN233. Holdeman, Janie Joyce. An investigation of lateral dominance as measured by balance, kinesthetic positioning, and flexibility. Thesis, Smith, 1962.

GN233. Perry, Colleen Ann Wylde. An investigation of leg preference tests. Thesis, Washington, 1968.

GN233. Pinkerton, Barbara Jeanne. Analysis of foot preference as indicated by selected tests: first grade boys and girls. Thesis, Washington, 1970.

GN233. Robinson, Edwin Nelson. A comparison of laterally dominant to crossed dominant individuals in tests of reaction time and hand-eye coordination. Thesis, California Santa Barbara, 1965.

GN454.5. Simri, Uriel. The religious and magical function of ball games in various cultures. Thesis, West Virginia, 1966.

GN455.B3. Cox, Allan Elton. An historical analysis of competitive rubber ball games in Mesoamerica, Arizona and the Greater Antilles. Thesis, Alberta, 1967.

GN456.89. Salter, Michael Albert. Games and pastimes of the Australian aboriginal. Thesis, Alberta, 1967.

GN456.98 P6. Jones, Kevin George. Games and physical activities of the ancient Polynesians and relationships to culture. Thesis, Alberta, 1967.

GR35. Folklore Institute of Japan. Japanese folklore dictionary, compiled by the Folklore Institute of Japan under the supervision of Kunio Yanagita. 1958.

GR110. Roberts, Leonard Ward. The tales and songs of the Couch family. Lexington, 1959.

GT1741. Folkers, Ireva A. Mayfair for the modern dance (a guide for costume design). Thesis, Iowa, 1967.

GV3.I57. Cadieux, Julien. Past and present influences of the International Recreation Association upon development of recreation in member countries. Thesis, Oregon, 1970.

GV14. Carls, Ernest Glenn. A study of social motives and patterns of leisure behavior. Thesis, Illinois, 1969.

GV14. Godbey, Geoffrey Clay. An analysis of the methods for the quantitative measurement of leisure. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1968.

GV14. Kingston, George Edward. Towards a classification of the theories of human play. Thesis, Alberta, 1968.

GV14. Lowery, George Andrew. A multivariate analysis of the relationship between selected leisure behavior variables and personal values. Thesis, Illinois, 1969.

GV14. Metcalfe, Alan. Working class 'free time' : its development and limitations. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1968.

GV14. Reeder, Alan Francis. The relationship of socio-economic status and leisure pursuits during retirement. Thesis, Utah, 1968.

GV14. Ruskin, Hillel. Principles for leisure education in the public schools of Israel. Thesis, New York, 1968.

GV14.5. Burkhardt, John E. Statistical comprehension for graduate students in physical education: test and norms. Thesis, Iowa, 1969.

GV14.5. Carlson, Nelson Thomas. The appropriateness of the analysis of covariance to the simple-randomized design in physical education research. Thesis, Iowa, 1967.

GV14.5. Frost, Ardith Bernice. Crucial behavioral dimensions of first line supervisors in municipal recreation. Thesis, Los Angeles, 1963.

GV14.5. Morrison, Donald Hugh. A rationale for the development of comparative physical education. Thesis, Alberta, 1967.

GV14.5. Myers, Helen Baird. A survey of volunteer junior leader programs in 156 recreation departments in the United States. Thesis, Maryland, 1964.

GV14.5. Parker, Adah Donohue. Projections for the selection, training and retention of sub-professional recreation leaders based on an analysis of personality, interest, aptitude, and preference data. Thesis, Illinois, 1966.

GV14.5. Purdy, Kenneth McLellan. Techniques of photography in physical education research. Thesis, Louisiana, 1969.

GV14.5. Roys, Keith Benjamin. Differential interests of male administrators in community recreation as compared to other occupations described by the Strong vocational interest approach. Thesis, Illinois, 1965.

GV14.5. Sherrow, Jeanne Elizabeth. The effect of a creative problem solving workshop on selected municipal recreation personnel. Thesis, Illinois, 1969.

GV14.5. Spaeth, Marsha Jane. An analysis of administrative research in physical education and athletics in relation to a research paradigm. Thesis, Illinois, 1967.

GV21. Kidd, Thomas Richard. The rise of athletic professionalism as it relates to ancient Greek culture. A study in lieu of a thesis, Oregon, 1969.

GV31. Lindsay, Peter L. Literary evidence of physical education among the ancient Romans. Thesis, Alberta, 1967.

GV53. Swanson, Richard Albin. American Protestantism and play, 1865-1915. Thesis, Ohio, 1967.

GV53. Turik, Henry Alexander. An investigation of school district special tax legislation for public recreation programs in six selected states. Thesis, Illinois, 1962.

GV54.A14. Olsen, Burton K. A study of school-sponsored and co-sponsored recreation programs in the North Central region of the United States. Minneapolis, 1970.

GV54.M6M5. Goodale, Thomas Lester. An analysis of leisure behavior and attitudes in selected Minneapolis census tracts. Thesis, Illinois, 1965.

GV54.N6A6. Heath, Edward Henry. A semantic differential study of attitudes relating to recreation as applied to a bicultural setting. Thesis, Illinois, 1966.

GV54.N95. Lindley, Donald Dean. Scope of outdoor recreation programs in thirty-five cities in the Pacific Northwest. Thesis, Oregon, 1970.

GV54.O7P6. Lensch, Dorothea Marie. The evolution of recreation programs in war housing projects in Portland, Oregon, between the years 1940-1960. Thesis, Oregon, 1966.

GV54.P4. Reich, Charles Miller. Socioeconomic factors related to household participation in community recreation. Thesis, Pennsylvania, 1965.

GV56.W5. Morrison, Douglas Allen. An analysis of evaluations of the Winnipeg Department of Parks and Recreation by the major recreation agencies of Winnipeg and Manitoba. Thesis, Oregon, 1967.

GV75. Watkins, Glenn G. The law and games in sixteenth century England. Thesis, Alberta, 1969.

GV119. Buckley, Chester W. Contemporary recreation in selected countries and colonies of Asia. Thesis, Springfield, 1966.

GV171. Allen, Joel Root. Use of a survey intrument to determine significant school recreation programs differences. Thesis, Los Angeles, 1967.

GV171.Elliott, Albert R. The development of an instrument for the evaluation of public recreation programs. Thesis, Purdue, 1969.

GV171. Halstead, Robert E. A survey of a rural population and the effect of physical education upon the selection of leisure activities. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1964.

GV171. Wightman, Brian John. Extra-curricular physical activity of entering university freshmen during their high school senior year, as a function of social class, residence location, and size of high school graduating class. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1965.

GV182.2. Hill, Samuel Eugene. The design of a farm-recreation facility. Illinios, 1964.

GV182.2. Munson, Karl Franklin. Opinions of providers and users about site quality for water-oriented recreation on eight small lakes in Arkansas. Thesis, Illinios, 1968.

GV182.2. Storey, Edward Herbert. A method of estimating the demand for outdoor recreation. Thesis, Illinios, 1964.

GV183. Horn, Lois Blanche. Factors in voluntary physical activity participation of university women students. Thesis, Washington, 1968.

GV183. Miller, Doris Ida. A comparison of women physical recreation participants and nonparticipants with respect to selected personality factors and physical education backgrounds. Thesis, Oregon, 1964.

GV183.5. Miller, Elizabeth Ann. An analysis of recreation for the ill and the handicapped in selected local public recreation systems. Thesis, Illinios, 1963.

GV54.N95. Lindley, Donald Dean. Scope of outdoor recreation programs in thirty-five cities in the Pacific Northwest. Thesis, Oregon, 1970.

GV54.O7P6. Lensch, Dorothea Marie. The evolution of recreation programs in war housing projects in Portland, Oregon, between the years 1940 and 1960. Thesis, Oregon, 1960.

GV54.P4. Reich, Charles Miller. Socioeconomic factors related to household participation in community recreation. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1965.

GV56.W5. An analysis of evaluations of the Winnipeg Department of Parks and Recreation agencies of Winnipeg and Manitoba. Thesis, Oregon, 1967.

GV75. Watkins, Glen G. The law and games in sixteenth century England. Thesis, Alberta, 1969.

GV119. Buckley, Chester W. Contemporary recreation in selected countries and colonies of Asia. Thesis, Springfield, 1966.

GV171. Allen, Joel Root. Use of a survey instrument to determine significant school recreation program differences. Thesis, UCLA, 1967.

GV171. Elliott, Albert R. The development of an instrument for the evaluation of public recreation programs. Thesis, Purdue, 1969.

GV171. Halstead, Robert E. A survey of a rural population and the effect of physical education upon the selction of leisure time activities. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1964.

GV171. Wightman, Brian John. Extra-curricular physical activity of entering university freshmen during their high school senior year, as a function of social class, residence location and size of high school graduating class. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1965.

GV182.2. Hill, Samuel Eugene. The design of a farm-recreation facility. Urbana, Ill. Thesis, University of Illinois, 1964.

GV182.2. Munson, Karl Franklin. Opinions of providers and users about site quality for water-orientated recreation on eight small lakes in Arkansas. Thesis, University of Illinois, 1968.

GV182.2. Storey, Edward Herbert. A method of estimating the demand for outdoor recreation. Thesis, University of Illinois, 1964.

GV183. Horn, Lois Blanche. Factors in Voluntary physical activity participation of university women students. Thesis, University of Washington, 1968.

GV183. Miller, Doris Ida. A comparison of women physical recreation participants and non participants with respect to selected personality factors and physical education backgrounds.

GV183.5.Miller, Elizabeth Ann. An analysis of recreation for the ill and the handicapped in selected local public recreation systems. Thesis, University of Illinois, 1963

GV183.7.Neal, Larry Lee. An investigation of attitudes toward and participation of special education teenagers and their non-retarded peers in Oregon's state parks. Thesis, Oregon, 1969.

GV192. Harrison, Gerard Alfred. An instument for evaluating family campgrounds. Thesis, Indiana, 1968.

GV197.H3. Stein, Thomas Adolph. Some effective outcomes accompanying a camping experience of physically handicapped adults. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1962.

GV197.S3. Gibson, William Garnet. Evaluation of outdoor education using Guttman scales and sociometric analysis. Thesis, Alberta, 1966.

GV198.C6. Saunders, Katherine. An exploration of the relationships between camp counseling and the teaching of physical education. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1966.

GV201. Research quarterly. v 1-30. Washington D.C. 1930-1959.

GV203.A4. Dayton, Norma Marie. An investigation of the aims and objectives of the American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation from 1930 to 1968. Thesis, Utah, 1969.

GV203.F6. Cleland, Troy Sumpter. History of the Florida Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, 1919 to 1965. Thesis, Florida, 1966.

GV207. National College Physical Education Association for Men. Committee on Terminology. Glossary of physical education terms. Houston, Texas, 1937.

GV211. Studer, Virginia Lee. The historical development of human movement fundamentals for college women in the United States. Thesis, Illinios, 1966.

GV223. Lynn, Minnie L. Major emphases in physical education in the United States. Thesis, Pittsburgh, 1944.

GV223. McPherson, Frances Ann. Development of ideas in physical education in the secondary schools in the United States between 1889 and 1920. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1965.

GV223. Wacker, Hazel Marie. The History of the private single purpose institutions which prepared teachers of physical education in the United States of America from 1861 to 1958. New York, 1959.

GV224.A1C2. DeGroot, Dudley Sargent. A history of physical education in California (1848-1939). Thesis, Stanford, 1940.

GV224.A1M2. Costello, Richard A. The relationship of attitudes held by senior boys and rated physical education programs in selected high schools in Maine. Thesis, Springfield, 1965.

GV224.A1M8. Frank, James. The relationship of some selected socio-economic factors to changes in physical education programs in certain localities in Missouri. Springfield,1963.

GV224A1N6. Comer, James L. An evaluation of the physical education program for boys in selected New Mexico senior high schools. Thesis, Utah, 1964.

GV224.A1W6. Gruber, Donald Albert. The status of physical education in public high schools of Wisconsin since the repeal of the time requirement. Thesis, Wisconsin,1966.

GV224.A1W6. Jones, Annie Lee. A fiscal study of physical education at the school district level in Wisconsin. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1965.

GV224.A1W6. Perry, Carol Jean. A study of content and conditions related to programs of physical education for girls in the secondary schools of Wisconsin in 1964-65. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1966.

GV224.D6. Swanson, Richard A. History of physical education in the Detroit Public Schools. Thesis, Wayne, 1964.

GV225.M6. Boucher, Jean Louis. Physical education in a bi-cultural society: the characteristics of school physical education programs as a function of the social values held by the two major ethnic groups in the City of Montreal. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1967.

GV245. Jacobs, David Hugh. An investigative study of physical education programs on the primary and secondary school levels in England. Thesis, Missouri, 1966.

GV247. Kerestes, Alexander. Physical education and sport in Hungary. Thesis, Alberta, 1967.

GV333.A3. Langsner, Franklin Royal. A study of the works and contributions of George Baird Affleck to health education, physical education and recreation education. Thesis, Springfield, 1967.

GV333.A5. Peterson, Hazel Clara. Dorothy S. Ainsworth: her life, professional career and contributions to physical education. Thesis, Ohio, 1968.

GV333.A7. McKeon, John Lawrence. A study of the works and contributions of Ernst Hermann Arnold to the profession of health and physical education. Thesis, Springfield, 1965.

GV333.B7. Napier, Anthony E. The contributions of Margaret Christina Brown to teacher education and physical education. Thesis, Pennsylvania, 1963.

GV333.C55. Ranta, Vicki Eileen. H. Harrison Clarke: his life and contributions to physical education. Thesis, Oregon, 1969.

GV333.H3. Lynn, Minnie L. An historical analysis of the professional career of Delphine Hanna. Thesis, Pennsylvania, 1937.

GV333.L3. Eaton, John Dougles. The life and professional contributions of Arthur Stanley Lamb, M.D., to physical education in Canada. Thesis, Ohio, 1964.

GV333.N3. Dewar, John. The life and professional contributions of James Naismith. Thesis, Florida, 1965.

GV333.N38. Jessup, Harvey Michael. Jay Bryan Nash: his contributions and influences in the fields of physical, health, recreation, camping and outdoor recreation. Thesis, New York, 1967.

GV333.N5. Tong, Curtis Whitfield. John Herbert Nichols, M.D.: a life of leadership in physical education and athletics. Thesis, Ohio, 1968.

GV333.S37. Feld, Allen Abraham. Harry Alexander Scott, teacher, scholar, administrator. Thesis, Utah, 1970.

GV333.S5. Collins, Miriam. The life of Jackson Roger Sharman, Sr., and his contributions to health, physical education, and recreation. Alberta, Canada, 1969.

GV333.V3. Daulman, Lois Marie. Winfred Van Hagen: leader in California physical education. Thesis, Berkeley, 1968.

GV333.W58. Culver, Anna Beth. Walter J. Wittich: physical educator, 1885-1953. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1967.

GV333.Z5. Wood, Nan Elizabeth. Elizabeth K. Zimmerli: a master teacher and administrator of physical education at Lock Haven State College from 1946 through 1966. Thesis, Florida, 1946.

GV341. Ambler, Victor Herbert. The effect of fatigue and non-fatigue upon the learning of selected basic soccer skills. Thesis, Washington, 1966.

GV341. Anderson, Cynthia C. A method of data collection and processing for cinematographic analysis of human movement in three dimensions. Madison, Wisconsin, 1970.

GV341. Bangerter, Blauer Lorenzo. Contributive components in the vertical jump. Thesis, Utah, 1964.

GV341. Bartee, Barbara Ann. The effect of applications of the principle of overload on the development of skill. Thesis,USC, 1965.

GV341. Bass, Buford Harold. The effects of isometric exercises on underhand throwing ability. Thesis, Louisiana, 1965.

GV341. Bates, James Dale. The effects of static and dynamic strength training and position of exercise on the acquisition of strength, speed of movement, reaction time, and endurance. Thesis, Louisiana, 1967.

GV341. Baumgarten, Naomi R. The effect of warm-up on the performance of a simple task involving speed of gross movements of the hand and arm. Thesis, Temple, 1965.

GV341. Bench, Douglas. The pain and fatigue suppressing effect of auditory stimili on maximal physical performance. Thesis, Toledo, 1969.

GV341. Blaikie, William. How to get strong and how to stay so. New York, Harper, 1879.

GV341. Blohm, Fred. Running endurance performance as affected by warm-up and varied rest intervals. Thesis, Arkansas, 1969.

GV341. Brink, Benjamin Deane. The body builder, Robert J. Roberts; being a collection of drills and health hints, and appreciations of the man who blazed the trail for physical education in the Young Men's Christian Association, with an introduction by Luther H. Gulick. New York, Association Press, 1916.

GV341. Brookins, James V. An investigation of the effect of running as a part of a high school wrestling training program to "fitness" and success in competitive wrestling. Thesis, Wisconson, 1969.

GV341. Caplan, Clavin Stephen. Transfer of the fatigue in motor performance. Thesis, Berkley, 1970.

GV341. Charles, Gary L. The effect of selected explosive weight training exercises upon leg strength, free running speed and explosive power. Thesis, South Dakota 1966.

Cobb, Robert A. The effects of selected visual conditions on throwing accuracy. Thesis, Springfield, 1969.

GV341. Curtis, Bruce Richard. Differences in self-concept and performance of a gross motor task. Thesis, Illinois, 1968.

GV341. Dick, Bruce Van Leuvan. A comparative study of distance, interval and mixed methods of training for competitive swimming. Thesis, Indiana, 1968

GV341. Dorfman, Sandra Phyllis. Attitude toward physical activity as a function of religious identification, with particular reference to Judaism. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1968.

GV341. Dotson, Charles Orville. An investigation of multivariate test criteria and their application to intergrated development components. Thesis, Purdue, 1968.

GV341. Dufty, Douglas Jay. An explosive weight-training program and its effect upon the leg power of nonwrestlers and their performance times of three selected wrestling maneuvers. Thesis, South Dakota, 1968.

GV341. Fisher, Arnold Garth. An experimental investigation of the effects of a weight training program on underdeveloped junior high school boys. Thesis, Sacramento, 1966.

GV341. Glidewell, William Foster. An investigation of various warm-up procedures in relation to physical performance. Thesis, Texas, 1964.

GV341. Gottshall, Donald R. The effects of two training programs on reflex time, reaction time and the level of physical fitness. Thesis, Springfield, 1962.

GV341. Guess, Liles Clay. A comparison of two training programs for maintaining increased muscular strength developed during an off-season conditioning program. Thesis, Texas, 1967.

GV341. Gulick,Luther Halsey. Physical education by muscular exercise. Philadelphia, 1904.

GV341. Harper, Donald DeWayne. Effect of interval, recreational, calisthenics and marching training programs on fitness in man. Thesis, Ohio, 1966.

GV341. Holmes, Harold Zachary, Jr. Effects of training on chronic health complaints of middle-aged men. Thesis, Illinois, 1969.

GV341. Jackson, Andrew Stonewall. A factor analysis of tests of muscular strength, endurance, and gross motor patterns that involve projecting objects and projecting the body. Oregon, 1969.

GV341. Jette, Maurice John. A study of long-term physical activity in sedentary middle-aged men. Thesis, Illinois, 1969.

GV341. Johnston, Bower Lyttleton. A study of the relationships among self-concept, movement concept, and physical fitness, and the effects of a physical condtioning program and a sports-skill program upon self-concept and movement concept. Oregon, 1969.

GV341. Katch, Victor L. The role of maximal oxygen intake as a determinant of endurance performance. Thesis, Berkeley, 1969.

GV341. Kendrick, Larry Lionel. Performance in selected gross motor skills before and after fatiguing exercise. Thesis, Lousiana, 1967.

GV341. Kennison, James Edward. The effects of four training programs on the acquisition of speed and accuracy in motor performance. Thesis, Louisiana, 1966.

GV341. Kight, Carl Ray. The effects of experimentally induced variations in body weight upon power. Thesis, Louisiana, 1967.

GV341. Kinne, Robbin Kluyskens. The relationship between the achievement of athletes and non-athletes in physical education, academics, and military leadership at the United States Naval Academy. Oregon, 1970.

GV341. Kuhn, Werner. The effects of physical warm-up and mental rehearsal on the performance of experienced and non-experienced soccer players in the soccer dribble test. Thesis, Oregon, 1971.

GV341. Luttgens, Kathryn. The construction of a film for use in instruction in posture and body mechanics. Thesis, Iowa, 1957.

GV341. Lyle, Berton Edward. An evaluation of the speed exercise technique in developing the components of fitness. Thesis, Texas, 1969.

GV341. Mequi, Aparicio Hipolito. Experiences affecting male university students who exhibit extreme positive and negative attitudes towards physical activity. Thesis, oregon, 1970.

GV341. Morris, William McKinley. The effects of isometric and isotonic weight training exercises upon quadricep strength and performance in a middle distance running event. 1969.

GV341. Newman, James Edward. The relationships among physical work capacity, physical fitness index and performance time in swimmers throughout a season of training. Thesis, Alberta, 1968.

GV341.Nicolau, Anthero. Comparison of an experimental and a traditional program of preseason football conditioning. Thesis, Springfield College, 1965.

GV341. O'Quinn, Michael Van Dusen. A comparison of conventional and in-plane Exer-genie training techniques in developing a forward passer. 1968.

GV341. Pecka, Alvin Dale. The effectiveness of rope jumping as an activity for improving agility of junior high school boys. Thesis, Washington State, 1965.

GV341. Pencek, Richard W. Effects of weight training on body weight, body density, and body fat. Thesis, Penn State, 1966.

GV341. Pinholster, Garland F. Analysis of generality and specificity of kinesthetic performance in gross motor skills. Thesis, Louisiana State, 1968.

GV341. Preskitt, Donna C. Strength increase as a factor in the performance of a gymnastic skill. Thesis, North Carolina, 1967.

GV341. Ragsdale, Lee Verdell. Contrast of maturity, physical, and scholastic measures between boys who elect and those who do not elect physical education in grade eleven. Thesis, Oregon, 1966.

GV341. Richarz, Wilbert Harold. The relationship of physical performance at the United States Air Force Academy to subsequent officer performance. Thesis, Oregon, 1969.

GV341. Scott, Jimmy Dan. The effect of isometric and elastic cord exercises on strength and speed of swimming. Thesis, Missouri, 1967.

GV341. Sloan, Richard Hendricks. An analysis of 1965 off-season training regimens of Big Ten swimmers. Thesis, Illinois, 1966.

GV341. Sloane, Robert Lindley. Predicting athletic success at the United States Military Academy. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1969.

GV341. Smoll, Frank Louis. The influence of physical growth and muscular strength upon motor performance: within and between year observations. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1966.

GV341. Straub, William Frederick. The effect of overload training procedures upon the velocity and accuracy of the overarm throw. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1966.

GV341. Sucec, Anthony Arnold. The effects of preliminary exercise on endurance performance. Thesis, UCB, 1967.

GV341. Sweeting, Roger L. Effects of various running and weight training programs on sprinting speed. Thesis, Penn State, 1963.

GV341. Thoden, James Stewart. An investigation of overarm throwing accuracy before and after heavy and severe treadmill exercise. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1966.

GV341. Thomas, James Carl. Relationships between body size, proportion and composition variables and standing broad jump and pull-up performances. Thesis, Springfield College, 1970.

GV341. Undlin, Marvin G. A comparison of four methods of circuit training. Thesis, WSU, 1965.

GV341. Van Rossen, Donald Peter. The effects of diversions on repetitive swimming performance. Thesis, Illinois, 1968.

GV341. Van Tine, Harold Curtis. The use of pegboards as a means of developing arm strength. Thesis, WSU, 1965.

GV341. Waddle, Benjamin. A study comparing the effectiveness of a training program utilizing the Exer-genie with two conventional training programs on the development of muscular strength and cardiovascular endurance. Thesis, Florida State, 1967.

GV341. Wilkinson, Robert E. Effect of motivational conditions upon the muscular performance of boys of different age levels. Thesis, Springfield College, 1965.

GV341. Williams, Clayton. The effects of weight training upon vertical jumping ability. Thesis, Kansas State, 1965.

GV341. Winningham, Sam Neil. Effect of training with ankle weights on running skill. Thesis, USC, 1966.

GV341. Wissel, Harold R. The effects of three physical conditioning programs for junior high school basketball players. Thesis, Springfield College, 1970.

GV342. Ballou, Ralph Burton. An anlaysis of the writings of selected Church Fathers to A.D. 394 to reveal attitudes regarding physical activity. Thesis, Oregon, 1965.

GV342. Banks, Gary Chester. The philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche as a foundation for physical education. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1966.

GV342. Edmondson, Cornelia. A continuum of thought on the value of health, physical education, and recreation from the time of John Locke through the early twentieth century. 1966.

GV342. Gerber, Ellen W. Three interpretations of the role of physical education, 1930-1960: Charles Harold McCloy, Jay Bryan Nash and Jesse Feiring Williams. Thesis, USC, 1966.

GV342. Moolenijzer, Nicolaas Johannes. The concept of "natural" in physical education: Johann Guts Muths-Margarete Streicher. Thesis, USC, 1965.

GV342. Paddick, Robert Joseph. The nature and place of a field of knowledge in physical education. Thesis, Alberta, 1967.

GV342. Shadduck, Ione Genevieve. A philosophical base for a physical education program design. Thesis, Michigan State, 1967.

GV342. Sherman, Atara Polonsky. Theoretical foundations of physical education in the United States : 1886-1930. Thesis, USC, 1965.

GV342. Siedentop, Daryl. A theory for programs of physical education in the schools. Thesis, Indiana U, 1968.

GV342. Slater, Morris Bert. An identification and comparison of some philosophical beliefs in the area of physical education held by elementary school teachers. Thesis, Oregon, 1966.

GV342. Slatton, Yvonne L. The philosophical beliefs of undergraduate and graduate physical education major students and the physical education faculty at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Thesis, North Carolina, 1964.

GV342. VanderZwaag, Harold John. Delineation of an essentialistic philosophy of physical education. Thesis, Michigan, 1962.

GV343.5. Case, Robert Lewis. An analysis of the communication structure of a university administrative and instructional unit. Thesis, Illinois, 1969.

GV343.5. Dannehl, Wayne Edward. The organizational climate in physical education administration units in selected miwestern universities. Thesis, Illinois, 1970.

GV343.5. Hansan, John Francis. A job analysis of secondary school men physical education administrators. Thesis, Oregon, 1969.

GV343.5. Olafson, Gordon Albert Alexander. Leader behavior of junior college and university physical education administrators. Thesis, Illinois, 1969.

GV343.5. Paton, Garth Alan. An analysis of administrative theory in selected graduate administration courses in physical education. Thesis, Illinois, 1970.

GV343.5. Penny, William John. An analysis of the meanings attached to selected concepts in administrative theory. Thesis, Illinois, 1968.

GV343.5. Wesener, Arthur A. Job analysis of supervisors of elementary school physical education in Wisconsin. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1963.

GV344. Conant, Richard D. The nature and frequency of injuries occurring to high school athletes insured through the Oregon School Activities Association Mutual Benefit Plan from 1965 to 1968. Thesis, Oregon, 1969.

GV344. Houston, Robert John. The nature and frequency of injuries occurring to high school athletes insured through the Oregon School Activities Association Mutual Benefit Plan from 1957 to 1960. Thesis, Oregon, 1964.

GV344. Payan, Jess. An experimental study of the effects of an eight week preseason weight training conditioning program on athletic injuries during the 1967 football season at Terra Linda High School, California. 1969.

GV345. Carver, Julia. A study of the influence of the philosophy of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints on physical education in Church schools. Thesis, Oregon, 1964.

GV345. Spence, Dale William. Analysis of selected values in physical education as identified by professional personnel. Thesis, Louisiana State, 1966.

GV345. Wagner, Ann Louise. The concept of physical education in selected liberal arts colleges. Thesis, Iowa State, 1963.

GV347. Forbush, Edward H. A survey to determine the compliance of National Junior College Athletic Association members to selected statements of the Dallas code. Thesis, Springfield College, 1968.

GV347. Olsen, Albert William. Intercollegiate athletics: current practices compared with recommended practices. Thesis, Oregon, 1969.

GV347. Weatherford, Terry Lynn. A history of the intramural sports program at the University of Illinois, 1903-1965. Thesis, Illinois, 1966.

GV357. Connor, Helen R. A study of the types and numbers of handicapping conditions of public school students, and of present practices in adapted physical education in the first and second class public shool districts of Oregon. Thesis, Oregon, 1965.

GV357. Healy, Alfred. A comparison of two methods of weight-training for children with spastic type of cerebral palsy. Thesis, Iowa State, 1957.

GV357. Meditch, Carl. Effectivesness of two methods of weight-training for children with athetoid type of cerebral palsy. Thesis, Iowa State, 1961.

GV357. Peery, Everett David. Group games for orthopedically handicapped children. Thesis, Oregon, 1961.

GV361. Al-Talib, Nizar Majeed. Attitude: consonant or dissonant role playing with high or low justification. Thesis, Illinois, 1969.

GV361. Allsen, Philip E. An evaluation of the physical education program for men in selected junior colleges. Thesis, Utah, 1965.

GV361. Anderson, Richard E. The effect of a physical conditioning program on body fat and body density. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1965.

GV361. Aziere, James F. Hypokinesia in physical education. Thesis, Kansas, 1967.

GV361. Bensch, Anne S. Attitudes of high school boys and girls toward physical education. Thesis, University of Toledo, 1969.

GV361. Borcher, William John. An analysis of public opinion in regard to physical education in public schools. Thesis, Oregon, 1964.

GV361. Brooke, John Dennis. The effects of a six week program of circuit training on the work output speed of muscular response and performance decrement in boys 13-15 years of age. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1965.

GV361. Burnstine, Deidre. An historical and interpretive survey of attitudes and attitude research in physical education. Thesis, North Carolina at Greensboro, 1966.

GV361. Cable, Donald Lee. Intramural sports courses in selected institutions of higher education. Thesis, Illinois, 1965.

GV361. Callahan, Harold Franklin. The effect of isometric training and rebound tumbling on performance in the vertical jump. Thesis, Arkansas State College, 1965.

GV361. Couper, Margaret Elena. An analysis of the transfer of horizontal momentum to a vertical jump. Thesis, Smith College, 1965.

GV361. Cross, John A. Attitudes toward physical education of male students entering the University of Oregon. Thesis, Oregon, 1964.

GV361. Daugherty, Burdon R. A discriminative study of boys' physical education in high schools of the Big Eight Athletic Conference. Thesis, Central Washington State College, 1969.

GV361. Gowan, Geoffrey Russell. Curriculum implications of a physical activity program for University of Wisconsin faculty males 45-59 years of age. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1968.

GV361. Griffin, Leon Everett. An evaluation of the physical education programs for men in selected universities. Thesis, Utah, 1966.

GV361. Hickman, John Arthur. Social class, attitude toward physical activity, and the physical activity of selected groups of college students. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1963.

GV361. Jarrett, Lincoln R. A theoretical model for a physical education curriculum in the middle school. Thesis, FSU, 1969.

GV361. Karst, Ralph Roland. The development of standards for potential achievement in physical education. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1967.

GV361. Kidd, Thomas Richard. An evaluation of the Foundations of Physical Activity course at the University of Oregon. Thesis, Oregon, 1970.

GV361. Leathers, Roger K. A study of the relationships between physical performance and academic achievement of Springfield College students. Thesis, Springfield College, 1967.

GV361. McClellan, Lincoln. An evaluation of the undergraduate professional preparation program in physical education at Utah State. Thesis, Oregon, 1963.

GV361. McCristal, King J. A study of the relationship between certain undergraduate success factors at Michigan State College and the vocational competence of male physical education graduates. Thesis, Columbia University, 1953.

GV361. Maetozo, Matthew G. An analysis of the professional preparation of interscholastic athletic coaches in selected sports. Thesis, Springfield College, 1965.

GV361. Mullins, Martha. Attitudes toward multidemensional physical activity as a function of race, sex, and socioeconomic level. Thesis, FSU, 1969.

GV361. Munch, Louis R. A five-year program for the professional preparation of male physical education teachers at Springfield College. Thesis, Springfield College, 1963.

GV361. Munch, Louis R. Selection and retention procedures for undergraduate male physical education majors. Thesis, Springfield College, 1969.

GV361. Pelton, Barry Clifton. A critical analysis of current concepts underlying general physical education programs in higher education. Thesis, USC, 1966.

GV361. Rothberg, Robert A. An analysis of opinions of selected physical educators regarding curriculum concepts. Thesis, FSU, 1966.

GV361. Schmuck, Dale Allen. Modular scheduling as related to the physical education program in secondary schools. Thesis, South Dakota State, 1968.

GV361. Schwich, Luther Clarence. An evaluation of a teacher education program in health and physical education. Thesis, Utah, 1961.

GV361. Sheehan, Thomas Joseph. The construction and testing of a teaching model for attitude formation and change through physical education. Thesis, Ohio State, 1965.

GV361. Swan, Dorothy Louise. The effect of the ethnic background on attitude and achievement in physical education. Thesis, California State College at Long Beach, 1968.

GV361. Tarbell, Beatrice. Changes in expressed reactions of superior high school students to physical education over a two year period. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1963.

GV361. Tuttle, Loren W. A study of certain aspects of graduate practices in health, physical education, and recreation. Thesis, Oregon, 1949.

GV361. Walker, William P. The development of a general knowledge inventory test and a resource syllabus for a foundation course in physical education for college freshmen. Thesis, FSU, 1965.

GV361. Willson, Kent R. The relative effects of various foot spacings on performance in the vertical jump. Thesis, Pennsylvania State, 1965.

GV362. Bookhout, Elizabeth Circle. An observational study of teaching behavior in relation to the social-emotional climate of physical education classes. Thesis, New York, 1965.

GV362. Heitmann, Helen M. Teacher effectiveness in relationship to motor fitness and temperament grouping. Thesis, Springfield College, 1966.

GV363. Benton, Carol Webber. Critical requirements for effective teaching in professional preparation on courses in physical education at California state colleges. Thesis, USC, 1960.

GV363. Chadwell, Ray. Instructional television in physical education. Thesis, Ohio State, 1962.

GV363. Keller, Roy Jacob. A comparison of two methods of teaching physical education to secondary school boys. Thesis, Illinois, 1963.

GV363. Stanley, John David. A survey of the advantages and disadvantages of using educational television in physical education. Thesis, Ohio State, 1962.

GV363. Watt, Norman Scott. Comparison of two methods of physical fitness training in low fitness males at the University of Oregon. Thesis, Oregon, 1961.

GV363. Wright, Rollin Gene. An analysis of the techniques of guiding student teaching experiences. Thesis, USC, 1965.

GV363. Wyness, Gerald B. A study of the effectiveness of motion pictures as an aid in teaching a gross motor skill. Thesis, Oregon, 1963.

GV367.W4. Degen, Robert. The evolution of physical education at the United States Military Academy. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1966.

GV403. Kleinfeldt, Robert Harland. Relative merits of wood and tile gymnasium floors. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1964.

GV435. Forsyth, Harry L. The estimation of lean body weight in male athletes. Thesis, Springfield College, 1970.

GV435. Jones, Lavetta Sue. The effect of a progressive program of exercise, using the exercycle, on anthropometric measurements of college women. Thesis, Washington, 1963.

GV435. Insley, Gerald Sloane. Differences in height, weight, and physical performance of sixteen year old Navajo and Caucasian males. Thesis, Oregon, 1966.

GV435. Kopischka, Layne H. Estimating lean body mass from anthropometric measurements. Thesis, Wyoming, 1969.

GV435. MacIntyre, Christine. Effect of a weight training program on body contours of young women 18-22. Thesis, UCLA, 1967.

GV435. Murphy, Harvey Frank. A comparison of techniques for estimating the amount of fat in the human body; and regression equations for predicting the amount of potassuim in the body. Thesis, Illinois, 1967.

GV436. Anderson, Frances Williams. A study of the relationships between physical performances of seventh-grade girls and a classification index based on age, height and weight. Thesis, Maryland, 1965.

GV436. Baumgartner, Ted A. The applicability of the Spearman-Brown Prophecy Formula when applied to selected physical performance tests. Thesis, Iowa, 1967.

GV436. Becker, Beverly June. Construction of a muscular strength test for college women. Thesis, Oregon, 1967.

GV436. Benson, Carolyn Roberts. A factor analysis of tests of balance, kinesthesis and motor patterns for projecting an object--with and without vision. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1965.

GV436. Bockman, Theodore. The correlation of thirty seven tests with the 100 yard drop-off test in swimming. Thesis, Illinois, 1951.

GV436. Bowles, Robert W. The relationship between physical fitness and social adjustment of male college students. Thesis, North Carolina, 1968.

GV436. Brace, David Kingsley. Measuring motor ability; a scale of motor ability tests. New York, 1930.

GV436. Brault, Donald. A comparison of the performance of elementary school children on the Kraus-Weber test of minimum muscular fitness with achievement on selected motor fitness measures. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1964.

GV436. Brennan, Mary Alice. A comparative study of skilled gymnasts and dancers on thirteen selected characteristics. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1967.

GV436. Bresett, Stephen M. A comparative study of the athletic capabilities of deaf and non deaf students. Thesis, Springfield College, 1971.

GV436. Brizendine, Stanley Farrel. A comparative study of the Harvard Step Test with tests of varied times and heights. Thesis, Michigan, 1967.

GV436. Broekhoff, Jan. Effect of physical education on the physical fitness of college freshman men and the motor fitness of college freshman women. Thesis, Oregon, 1962.

GV436. Browning, Freddie Melton. A comparison of sprint and distance runners on selected anatomical and physiological parameters. Thesis, Florida, 1969.

GV436. Buchanan, Kathryn Ann. A comparison of motor ability and of skill in selected basic activities of twelve and fifteen year old girls participating in physical education in England and the United States. Thesis, Washington, 1967.

GV436. Budde, Elaine Helen. The relationship between performance of kindergarten children on selected motor tests and the Metropolitan Readiness Tests-- Otis Lennon Mental Ability Test. Madison, 1970.

GV436. Carrol, Joseph Francis. The effects of selected therapeutic postural exercises on the physical efficiency of workers in the male clothing industry. Philadelphia, 1953.

GV436. Churdar, John Bunyan. A study of the effect of four different frequencies of a specific exercise program on physical fitness. Thesis, Florida, 1967.

GV436. Clayton, Robert Donald. Construction of norms for strength tests composing Rogers strength index battery: boys nine through fourteen years of age. Thesis, Oregon, 1960.

GV436. Corroll, Victor Alexander. AAHPER Youth Fitness Test items and maximal oxygen intake. Thesis, Illinois, 1967.

GV436. Craven, Charles Wesley. An evaluation of methods of administering the sit-up test. Thesis, Texas, 1968.

GV436. Darby, Jake. A comparison of results obtained on the Arkansas State College Motor Fitness Test with results from selected tests of physical abilities. Thesis, Arkansas State, 1965.

GV436. Disney, Richard Ferris. A comparative study of mentally gifted and average intelligence high school boys in physical education. Thesis, San Diego, 1963.

GV436. Doornink, Robert Hadley. The feasibility of using strength fitness as a predictor of student success at the University of Oregon. Thesis, Oregon, 1962.

GV436. Drowatzky, John Nelson. Evaluation of the physical and motor fitness of boys and girls in the Coos Bay, Oregon, School District, by John Nelson Drowatzky and Charles John Madary. Thesis, Oregon, 1962.

GV436. Duke, Susan Kay. Evaluation of selected motor tests used in exempting college women from a basic skills course in physical education. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1966.

GV436. Dunn, John M. An investigation of the Ohio State Step Test as an instrumnet for assessing the cardiovascular efficiency of 13-18 year old boys. Oregon, 1969.

GV436. Dvorak, Sandra Erickson. A subjective evaluation of fundamental locomotor movement in modern dance using a five point rating scale. Thesis, South Dakota State, 1967.

GV436. Elfenbaum, Louis. The physiological effects of rapid weight loss among wrestlers. Thesis, Ohio State, 1966.

GV436. Estes, Mary Louise. The relationship between the performance of third grade children on the Johnson Metheny test and their performance on each of three tests of selected motor skills. Thesis, Colorado, 1962.

GV436. Fedoruk, Dennis E. An evaluation of two versions of the Sjostrand physical work capacity test. Thesis, Alberta, 1969.

GV436. Flynn, Kenneth William. Relationship between various standing broad jump measures and strength, speed, body size and physique measures of twelve year old boys. Thesis, Oregon, 1966.

GV436. Gearhart, Everett Earl. An evaluation of performances in selected physical ability tests by elementary school boys classified on the basis of Wetzel grid developmental levels. Thesis, Washington, 1963.

GV436. Geck, Pete Richard. Effects of a fitness enrichment program on sub-fit adolescent boys. Thesis, San Diego, 1966.

GV436. Getchell, Leroy Harrison. An analysis of the effects of a season of golf on selected cardiovascular, metabolic, and muscular fitness measures on middle-aged men; and the caloric cost of golf. Thesis, Illinois, 1965.

GV436. Gilbert, Paul F. The effect of differing sleep intervals on selected sports skills. Thesis, Springfield College, 1967.

GV436. Glover, Elizabeth Gay. Physical fitness test items for boys and girls in the first, second, and third grades. Thesis, North Carolina, 1962.

GV436. Hall, Judith Bannister. Simplification of the Rogers strength and physical fitness index for college women. Thesis, Oregon, 1964.

GV436. Hanson, Margie Rosann. Motor performance testing of elementary school age children. Thesis, Washington, 1965.

GV436. Hardin, Jan Christopher. A study to determine the validity of using self-evaluation to estimate one's level of achievement in physical fitness and recreational sports. Washington, 1969.

GV436. Herbert, William G. The effect of dehydration and subsequent rehydration on the physical working capacity of college wrestlers. Thesis, Ohio, 1969.

GV436. Holland, George Joseph. The effects of limited sleep deprivation on the performance of selected motor tasks. Thesis, USC, 1966.

GV436. Howe, Bruce Leslie. Test profiles of outstanding twelve year old elementary school athletes at nine, twelve, and fifteen years of age. Thesis, Oregon, 1966.

GV436. Hoyman, Annelis Strange. Prediction of physical endurance of college women from metabolic variables. Thesis, Illinois, 1963.

GV436. Hudson, Don Richard. A clinical approach to physical education for college men. Thesis, Utah, 1965.

GV436. Hunsicker, Paul Alfred. A survey and comparison of youth fitness, 1958-1965, by Paul A. Hunsicker and Guy G. Reiff. Thesis, Michigan, 1965.

GV436. Jacobs, David A. A comparison between the physical fitness index and a battery of cable-tension strength tests. Thesis, Springfield College, 1968.

GV436. James, Roger D. Comparison of physical fitness indices of Washington State University freshmen men having varying years of participation in high school physical education and athletics. Thesis, Washington State, 1965.

GV436. Jones, Gary Joe. The effects of cross country endurance bicycling on an individual's physical fitness. Thesis, Ball State, 1969.

GV436. Jordan, Charles Stonehouse. The C.A.H.P.E.R. Fitness-Performance Test as validated by the Fleishman Basic Fitness Test. Thesis, University of British Columbia, 1966.

GV436. Kasper, Raymond Terrance. A normative study of selected physical fitness measures for secondary school boys (14-18). Thesis, Illinois, 1968.

GV436. Kelly, Brian John. Single-year and longitudinal comparisons of maturity, physique, structural, strength, and motor characteristics of seventeen and eighteen-year-old high school athletes and nonparticipants. Thesis, Oregon, 1969.

GV436. Keogh, Jack. Motor performance of elementary school children. Thesis, UCLA, 1965.

GV436. Klesius, Stephen E. A comparison of methods for estimating the reliability of selected test items of the AAHPER Youth Fitness Test. Thesis, FSU, 1966.

GV436. Knowlton, Elizabeth Emery. A study to determine the location of peak performance data for college women in three measures of all-out perfomance. Thesis, Wisconsin, 1967.

GV436. Kuntzleman, Charles T. The effects of 1200 calorie diets and partial dehydration on selected neuromuscular and cardiovascular performances of well-conditioned college men. Thesis, Temple University, 1965.

GV436. Kurucz, Robert Leonard. The construction of the Ohio State University Cardiovascular Fitness Test. Thesis, Ohio State, 1967.

GV436. Lacey, Patricia. A comparison of methods of administering modified pull-ups for girls. Thesis, Central Washington State College, 1969.

GV436. Lauro, Geraldine. Motor performance of primary grade children. Thesis, Berkeley, 1967.

GV436. McCauliff, C. A test of selected agility components. Thesis, Springfield College, 1968.

GV436. McCollum, Garland L. A comparison between the physically fit and the physically unfit in intelligence, academic achievement, and attendance in school. Thesis, Arkansas State, 1962.

GV436. McCollum, Robert Huston. The effect of L-Lysine and a vitamin compound upon the physical performance of sub-par college men. Thesis, Oregon, 1960.

GV436. McKinney, Donald Dean. The construction of a motor fitness test battery for under-graduate male physical education majors. Thesis, Northwestern State of Louisiana, 1971.

GV436. Mathews, Donald K. The relationship between strength loss in pack carrying and certain motor-physical fitness criteria. Thesis, Springfield College, 1954.

GV436. Mequi, Aparicio H. Comparison of performances in the AAHPER youth fitness test between University of the Phillipines entering freshmen students and American and Japanese boys. Thesis, Oregon, 1965.

GV436. Mesenbrink, Robberta. The relationship of overhand throwing ability to general motor ability in college freshmen women. Thesis, Woman's College, North Carolina, 1963.

GV436. Metheny, Rachael Eleanor. Breathing capacity and grip strength of preschool children. Thesis, Iowa State, 1940.

GV436. Miller, Frederick Stanton. A comparitive analysis of physical performance between male Caucasian and non-Caucasian (Mexican) students at the seventh and eighth grade level. Thesis, California State College at Long Beach, 1968.

GV436. Miller, Jeffrey O. A study of the relationship between certain fitness variables and an index of scholastic standing in a selected sample of N.S.W. public secondary school children. Thesis, University of Sydney, 1962.

GV436. Mitchell, James Reid. Single-year and longitudinal comparisons of maturity, physique, structural, motor and strength characteristics of fifteen-year-old junior high school athletes and nonparticipants. Thesis, Oregon, 1968.

Syntax

  • name = name of variable to define

  • style = delete or index or loop or world or universe or uloop or string or format or getenv or file or atomfile or python or internal or equal or vector or atom

    delete = no args index args = one or more strings loop args = N N = integer size of loop, loop from 1 to N inclusive loop args = N pad N = integer size of loop, loop from 1 to N inclusive pad = all values will be same length, e.g. 001, 002, ..., 100 loop args = N1 N2 N1,N2 = loop from N1 to N2 inclusive loop args = N1 N2 pad N1,N2 = loop from N1 to N2 inclusive pad = all values will be same length, e.g. 050, 051, ..., 100 world args = one string for each partition of processors universe args = one or more strings uloop args = N N = integer size of loop uloop args = N pad N = integer size of loop pad = all values will be same length, e.g. 001, 002, ..., 100 string arg = one string format args = vname fstr vname = name of equal-style variable to evaluate fstr = C-style format string getenv arg = one string file arg = filename atomfile arg = filename python arg = function internal arg = numeric value equal or vector or atom args = one formula containing numbers, thermo keywords, math operations, group functions, atom values and vectors, compute/fix/variable references numbers = 0.0, 100, -5.4, 2.8e-4, etc constants = PI, version, on, off, true, false, yes, no thermo keywords = vol, ke, press, etc from thermo_style math operators = (), -x, x+y, x-y, x*y, x/y, x^y, x%y, x == y, x != y, x < y, x <= y, x > y, x >= y, x && y, x || y, x |^ y, !x math functions = sqrt(x), exp(x), ln(x), log(x), abs(x), sin(x), cos(x), tan(x), asin(x), acos(x), atan(x), atan2(y,x), random(x,y,z), normal(x,y,z), ceil(x), floor(x), round(x) ramp(x,y), stagger(x,y), logfreq(x,y,z), logfreq2(x,y,z), stride(x,y,z), stride2(x,y,z,a,b,c), vdisplace(x,y), swiggle(x,y,z), cwiggle(x,y,z) group functions = count(group), mass(group), charge(group), xcm(group,dim), vcm(group,dim), fcm(group,dim), bound(group,dir), gyration(group), ke(group), angmom(group,dim), torque(group,dim), inertia(group,dimdim), omega(group,dim) region functions = count(group,region), mass(group,region), charge(group,region), xcm(group,dim,region), vcm(group,dim,region), fcm(group,dim,region), bound(group,dir,region), gyration(group,region), ke(group,reigon), angmom(group,dim,region), torque(group,dim,region), inertia(group,dimdim,region), omega(group,dim,region) special functions = sum(x), min(x), max(x), ave(x), trap(x), slope(x), gmask(x), rmask(x), grmask(x,y), next(x) feature functions = is_active(category,feature,exact), is_defined(category,id,exact) atom value = id[i], mass[i], type[i], mol[i], x[i], y[i], z[i], vx[i], vy[i], vz[i], fx[i], fy[i], fz[i], q[i] atom vector = id, mass, type, mol, x, y, z, vx, vy, vz, fx, fy, fz, q compute references = c_ID, c_ID[i], c_ID[i][j], C_ID, C_ID[i] fix references = f_ID, f_ID[i], f_ID[i][j], F_ID, F_ID[i] variable references = v_name, v_name[i]
variablenamestyleargs...

Examples

variable x index run1 run2 run3 run4 run5 run6 run7 run8 variable LoopVar loop $n variable beta equal temp/3.0 variable b1 equal x[234]+0.5*vol variable b1 equal "x[234] + 0.5*vol" variable b equal xcm(mol1,x)/2.0 variable b equal c_myTemp variable b atom x*y/vol variable foo string myfile variable foo internal 3.5 variable myPy python increase variable f file values.txt variable temp world 300.0 310.0 320.0 ${Tfinal} variable x universe 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 variable x uloop 15 pad variable str format x %.6g variable x delete

Description

This command assigns one or more strings to a variable name for evaluation later in the input script or during a simulation.

Variables can thus be useful in several contexts. A variable can be defined and then referenced elsewhere in an input script to become part of a new input command. For variable styles that store multiple strings, the next command can be used to increment which string is assigned to the variable. Variables of style equal store a formula which when evaluated produces a single numeric value which can be output either directly (see the print, fix print, and run every commands) or as part of thermodynamic output (see the thermo_style command), or used as input to an averaging fix (see the fix ave/time command). Variables of style vector store a formula which produces a vector of such values which can be used as input to various averaging fixes, or elements of which can be part of thermodynamic output. Variables of style atom store a formula which when evaluated produces one numeric value per atom which can be output to a dump file (see the dump custom command) or used as input to an averaging fix (see the fix ave/chunk and fix ave/atom commands). Variables of style atomfile can be used anywhere in an input script that atom-style variables are used; they get their per-atom values from a file rather than from a formula. Variables of style python can be hooked to Python functions using code you provide, so that the variable gets its value from the evaluation of the Python code. Variables of style internal are used by a few commands which set their value directly.

Note

As discussed in Section 3.2 of the manual, an input script can use “immediate” variables, specified as $(formula) with parenthesis, where the formula has the same syntax as equal-style variables described on this page. This is a convenient way to evaluate a formula immediately without using the variable command to define a named variable and then evaluate that variable. See below for a more detailed discussion of this feature.

In the discussion that follows, the “name” of the variable is the arbitrary string that is the 1st argument in the variable command. This name can only contain alphanumeric characters and underscores. The “string” is one or more of the subsequent arguments. The “string” can be simple text as in the 1st example above, it can contain other variables as in the 2nd example, or it can be a formula as in the 3rd example. The “value” is the numeric quantity resulting from evaluation of the string. Note that the same string can generate different values when it is evaluated at different times during a simulation.

Note

When an input script line is encountered that defines a variable of style equal or vector or atom or python that contains a formula or Python code, the formula is NOT immediately evaluated. It will be evaluated every time when the variable is used instead. If you simply want to evaluate a formula in place you can use as so-called. See the section below about “Immediate Evaluation of Variables” for more details on the topic. This is also true of a format style variable since it evaluates another variable when it is invoked.

Variables of style equal and vector and atom can be used as inputs to various other commands which evaluate their formulas as needed, e.g. at different timesteps during a run.

Variables of style internal can be used in place of an equal-style variable, except by commands that set the value stored by the internal-style variable. Thus any command that states it can use an equal-style variable as an argument, can also use an internal-style variable. This means that when the command evaluates the variable, it will use the value set (internally) by another command.

Variables of style python can be used in place of an equal-style variable so long as the associated Python function, as defined by the python command, returns a numeric value. Thus any command that states it can use an equal-style variable as an argument, can also use such a python-style variable. This means that when the LAMMPS command evaluates the variable, the Python function will be executed.

Note

When a variable command is encountered in the input script and the variable name has already been specified, the command is ignored. This means variables can NOT be re-defined in an input script (with two exceptions, read further). This is to allow an input script to be processed multiple times without resetting the variables; see the jump or include commands. It also means that using the command-line switch -var will override a corresponding index variable setting in the input script.

There are two exceptions to this rule. First, variables of style string, getenv, internal, equal, vector, atom, and python ARE redefined each time the command is encountered. This allows these style of variables to be redefined multiple times in an input script. In a loop, this means the formula associated with an equal or atom style variable can change if it contains a substitution for another variable, e.g. $x or v_x.

Second, as described below, if a variable is iterated on to the end of its list of strings via the next command, it is removed from the list of active variables, and is thus available to be re-defined in a subsequent variable command. The delete style does the same thing.


This section of the manual explains how occurrences of a variable name in an input script line are replaced by the variable’s string. The variable name can be referenced as $x if the name “x” is a single character, or as ${LoopVar} if the name “LoopVar” is one or more characters.

As described below, for variable styles index, loop, file, universe, and uloop, which string is assigned to a variable can be incremented via the next command. When there are no more strings to assign, the variable is exhausted and a flag is set that causes the next jump command encountered in the input script to be skipped. This enables the construction of simple loops in the input script that are iterated over and then exited from.

As explained above, an exhausted variable can be re-used in an input script. The delete style also removes the variable, the same as if it were exhausted, allowing it to be redefined later in the input script or when the input script is looped over. This can be useful when breaking out of a loop via the if and jump commands before the variable would become exhausted. For example,


This section describes how all the various variable styles are defined and what they store. Except for the equal and vector and atom styles, which are explained in the next section.

Many of the styles store one or more strings. Note that a single string can contain spaces (multiple words), if it is enclosed in quotes in the variable command. When the variable is substituted for in another input script command, its returned string will then be interpreted as multiple arguments in the expanded command.

For the index style, one or more strings are specified. Initially, the 1st string is assigned to the variable. Each time a next command is used with the variable name, the next string is assigned. All processors assign the same string to the variable.

Index style variables with a single string value can also be set by using the command-line switch -var; see this section for details.

The loop style is identical to the index style except that the strings are the integers from 1 to N inclusive, if only one argument N is specified. This allows generation of a long list of runs (e.g. 1000) without having to list N strings in the input script. Initially, the string “1” is assigned to the variable. Each time a next command is used with the variable name, the next string (“2”, “3”, etc) is assigned. All processors assign the same string to the variable. The loop style can also be specified with two arguments N1 and N2. In this case the loop runs from N1 to N2 inclusive, and the string N1 is initially assigned to the variable. N1 <= N2 and N2 >= 0 is required.

For the world style, one or more strings are specified. There must be one string for each processor partition or “world”. See this section of the manual for information on running LAMMPS with multiple partitions via the “-partition” command-line switch. This variable command assigns one string to each world. All processors in the world are assigned the same string. The next command cannot be used with equal style variables, since there is only one value per world. This style of variable is useful when you wish to run different simulations on different partitions, or when performing a parallel tempering simulation (see the temper command), to assign different temperatures to different partitions.

For the universe style, one or more strings are specified. There must be at least as many strings as there are processor partitions or “worlds”. See this page for information on running LAMMPS with multiple partitions via the “-partition” command-line switch. This variable command initially assigns one string to each world. When a next command is encountered using this variable, the first processor partition to encounter it, is assigned the next available string. This continues until all the variable strings are consumed. Thus, this command can be used to run 50 simulations on 8 processor partitions. The simulations will be run one after the other on whatever partition becomes available, until they are all finished. Universe style variables are incremented using the files “tmp.lammps.variable” and “tmp.lammps.variable.lock” which you will see in your directory during such a LAMMPS run.

The uloop style is identical to the universe style except that the strings are the integers from 1 to N. This allows generation of long list of runs (e.g. 1000) without having to list N strings in the input script.

For the string style, a single string is assigned to the variable. The only difference between this and using the index style with a single string is that a variable with string style can be redefined. E.g. by another command later in the input script, or if the script is read again in a loop.

For the format style, an equal-style variable is specified along with a C-style format string, e.g. “%f” or “%.10g”, which must be appropriate for formatting a double-precision floating-point value. This allows an equal-style variable to be formatted specifically for output as a string, e.g. by the print command, if the default format “%.15g” has too much precision.

For the getenv style, a single string is assigned to the variable which should be the name of an environment variable. When the variable is evaluated, it returns the value of the environment variable, or an empty string if it not defined. This style of variable can be used to adapt the behavior of LAMMPS input scripts via environment variable settings, or to retrieve information that has been previously stored with the shell putenv command. Note that because environment variable settings are stored by the operating systems, they persist beyond a clear command.

For the file style, a filename is provided which contains a list of strings to assign to the variable, one per line. The strings can be numeric values if desired. See the discussion of the next() function below for equal-style variables, which will convert the string of a file-style variable into a numeric value in a formula.

When a file-style variable is defined, the file is opened and the string on the first line is read and stored with the variable. This means the variable can then be evaluated as many times as desired and will return that string. There are two ways to cause the next string from the file to be read: use the next command or the next() function in an equal- or atom-style variable, as discussed below.

The rules for formatting the file are as follows. A comment character “#” can be used anywhere on a line; text starting with the comment character is stripped. Blank lines are skipped. The first “word” of a non-blank line, delimited by white space, is the “string” assigned to the variable.

For the atomfile style, a filename is provided which contains one or more sets of values, to assign on a per-atom basis to the variable. The format of the file is described below.

When an atomfile-style variable is defined, the file is opened and the first set of per-atom values are read and stored with the variable. This means the variable can then be evaluated as many times as desired and will return those values. There are two ways to cause the next set of per-atom values from the file to be read: use the next command or the next() function in an atom-style variable, as discussed below.

The rules for formatting the file are as follows. Each time a set of per-atom values is read, a non-blank line is searched for in the file. A comment character “#” can be used anywhere on a line; text starting with the comment character is stripped. Blank lines are skipped. The first “word” of a non-blank line, delimited by white space, is read as the count N of per-atom lines to immediately follow. N can be be the total number of atoms in the system, or only a subset. The next N lines have the following format

where ID is an atom ID and value is the per-atom numeric value that will be assigned to that atom. IDs can be listed in any order.

Note

Every time a set of per-atom lines is read, the value for all atoms is first set to 0.0. Thus values for atoms whose ID does not appear in the set, will remain 0.0.

For the python style a Python function name is provided. This needs to match a function name specified in a python command which returns a value to this variable as defined by its return keyword. For example these two commands would be self-consistent:

The two commands can appear in either order so long as both are specified before the Python function is invoked for the first time.

Each time the variable is evaluated, the associated Python function is invoked, and the value it returns is also returned by the variable. Since the Python function can use other LAMMPS variables as input, or query interal LAMMPS quantities to perform its computation, this means the variable can return a different value each time it is evaluated.

The type of value stored in the variable is determined by the format keyword of the python command. It can be an integer (i), floating point (f), or string (s) value. As mentioned above, if it is a numeric value (integer or floating point), then the python-style variable can be used in place of an equal-style variable anywhere in an input script, e.g. as an argument to another command that allows for equal-style variables.

For the internal style a numeric value is provided. This value will be assigned to the variable until a LAMMPS command sets it to a new value. There are currently only two LAMMPS commands that require internal variables as inputs, because they reset them: create_atoms and fix controller. As mentioned above, an internal-style variable can be used in place of an equal-style variable anywhere else in an input script, e.g. as an argument to another command that allows for equal-style variables.


For the equal and vector and atom styles, a single string is specified which represents a formula that will be evaluated afresh each time the variable is used. If you want spaces in the string, enclose it in double quotes so the parser will treat it as a single argument. For equal-style variables the formula computes a scalar quantity, which becomes the value of the variable whenever it is evaluated. For vector-style variables the formula must compute a vector of quantities, which becomes the value of the variable whenever it is evaluated. The calculated vector can be on length one, but it cannot be a simple scalar value like that produced by an equal-style compute. I.e. the formula for a vector-style variable must have at least one quantity in it that refers to a global vector produced by a compute, fix, or other vector-style variable. For atom-style variables the formula computes one quantity for each atom whenever it is evaluated.

Note that equal, vector, and atom variables can produce different values at different stages of the input script or at different times during a run. For example, if an equal variable is used in a fix print command, different values could be printed each timestep it was invoked. If you want a variable to be evaluated immediately, so that the result is stored by the variable instead of the string, see the section below on “Immediate Evaluation of Variables”.

The next command cannot be used with equal or vector or atom style variables, since there is only one string.

The formula for an equal, vector, or atom variable can contain a variety of quantities. The syntax for each kind of quantity is simple, but multiple quantities can be nested and combined in various ways to build up formulas of arbitrary complexity. For example, this is a valid (though strange) variable formula:

variable x equal "pe + c_MyTemp / vol^(1/3)"

Specifically, a formula can contain numbers, constants, thermo keywords, math operators, math functions, group functions, region functions, atom values, atom vectors, compute references, fix references, and references to other variables.

Number0.2, 100, 1.0e20, -15.4, etc
ConstantPI, version, on, off, true, false, yes, no
Thermo keywordsvol, pe, ebond, etc
Math operators(), -x, x+y, x-y, x*y, x/y, x^y, x%y, x == y, x != y, x < y, x <= y, x > y, x >= y, x && y, x || y, x |^ y, !x
Math functionssqrt(x), exp(x), ln(x), log(x), abs(x), sin(x), cos(x), tan(x), asin(x), acos(x), atan(x), atan2(y,x), random(x,y,z), normal(x,y,z), ceil(x), floor(x), round(x), ramp(x,y), stagger(x,y), logfreq(x,y,z), logfreq2(x,y,z), stride(x,y,z), stride2(x,y,z,a,b,c), vdisplace(x,y), swiggle(x,y,z), cwiggle(x,y,z)
Group functionscount(ID), mass(ID), charge(ID), xcm(ID,dim), vcm(ID,dim), fcm(ID,dim), bound(ID,dir), gyration(ID), ke(ID), angmom(ID,dim), torque(ID,dim), inertia(ID,dimdim), omega(ID,dim)
Region functionscount(ID,IDR), mass(ID,IDR), charge(ID,IDR), xcm(ID,dim,IDR), vcm(ID,dim,IDR), fcm(ID,dim,IDR), bound(ID,dir,IDR), gyration(ID,IDR), ke(ID,IDR), angmom(ID,dim,IDR), torque(ID,dim,IDR), inertia(ID,dimdim,IDR), omega(ID,dim,IDR)
Special functionssum(x), min(x), max(x), ave(x), trap(x), slope(x), gmask(x), rmask(x), grmask(x,y), next(x)
Atom valuesid[i], mass[i], type[i], mol[i], x[i], y[i], z[i], vx[i], vy[i], vz[i], fx[i], fy[i], fz[i], q[i]
Atom vectorsid, mass, type, mol, x, y, z, vx, vy, vz, fx, fy, fz, q
Compute referencesc_ID, c_ID[i], c_ID[i][j], C_ID, C_ID[i]
Fix referencesf_ID, f_ID[i], f_ID[i][j], F_ID, F_ID[i]
Other variablesv_name, v_name[i]

Most of the formula elements produce a scalar value. Some produce a global or per-atom vector of values. Global vectors can be produced by computes or fixes or by other vector-style variables. Per-atom vectors are produced by atom vectors, compute references that represent a per-atom vector, fix references that represent a per-atom vector, and variables that are atom-style variables. Math functions that operate on scalar values produce a scalar value; math function that operate on global or per-atom vectors do so element-by-element and produce a global or per-atom vector.

A formula for equal-style variables cannot use any formula element that produces a global or per-atom vector. A formula for a vector-style variable can use formula elements that produce either a scalar value or a global vector value, but cannot use a formula element that produces a per-atom vector. A formula for an atom-style variable can use formula elements that produce either a scalar value or a per-atom vector, but not one that produces a global vector. Atom-style variables are evaluated by other commands that define a group on which they operate, e.g. a dump or compute or fix command. When they invoke the atom-style variable, only atoms in the group are included in the formula evaluation. The variable evaluates to 0.0 for atoms not in the group.


Numbers, constants, and thermo keywords

Numbers can contain digits, scientific notation (3.0e20,3.0e-20,3.0E20,3.0E-20), and leading minus signs.

Constants are set at compile time and cannot be changed. PI will return the number 3.14159265358979323846; on, true or yes will return 1.0; off, false or no will return 0.0; version will return a numeric version code of the current LAMMPS version (e.g. version 2 Sep 2015 will return the number 20150902). The corresponding value for newer versions of LAMMPS will be larger, for older versions of LAMMPS will be smaller. This can be used to have input scripts adapt automatically to LAMMPS versions, when non-backwards compatible syntax changes are introduced. Here is an illustrative example (which will not work, since the version has been introduced more recently):

The thermo keywords allowed in a formula are those defined by the thermo_style custom command. Thermo keywords that require a compute to calculate their values such as “temp” or “press”, use computes stored and invoked by the thermo_style command. This means that you can only use those keywords in a variable if the style you are using with the thermo_style command (and the thermo keywords associated with that style) also define and use the needed compute. Note that some thermo keywords use a compute indirectly to calculate their value (e.g. the enthalpy keyword uses temp, pe, and pressure). If a variable is evaluated directly in an input script (not during a run), then the values accessed by the thermo keyword must be current. See the discussion below about “Variable Accuracy”.

if $(version<20140513) then "communicate vel yes" else "comm_modify vel yes"

Math Operators

Math operators are written in the usual way, where the “x” and “y” in the examples can themselves be arbitrarily complex formulas, as in the examples above. In this syntax, “x” and “y” can be scalar values or per-atom vectors. For example, “ke/natoms” is the division of two scalars, where “vy+vz” is the element-by-element sum of two per-atom vectors of y and z velocities.

Operators are evaluated left to right and have the usual C-style precedence: unary minus and unary logical NOT operator “!” have the highest precedence, exponentiation “^” is next; multiplication and division and the modulo operator “%” are next; addition and subtraction are next; the 4 relational operators “<”, “<=”, “>”, and “>=” are next; the two remaining relational operators “==” and “!=” are next; then the logical AND operator “&&”; and finally the logical OR operator “||” and logical XOR (exclusive or) operator “|^” have the lowest precedence. Parenthesis can be used to group one or more portions of a formula and/or enforce a different order of evaluation than what would occur with the default precedence.

Note

Because a unary minus is higher precedence than exponentiation, the formula “-2^2” will evaluate to 4, not -4. This convention is compatible with some programming languages, but not others. As mentioned, this behavior can be easily overridden with parenthesis; the formula “-(2^2)” will evaluate to -4.

The 6 relational operators return either a 1.0 or 0.0 depending on whether the relationship between x and y is TRUE or FALSE. For example the expression x<10.0 in an atom-style variable formula will return 1.0 for all atoms whose x-coordinate is less than 10.0, and 0.0 for the others. The logical AND operator will return 1.0 if both its arguments are non-zero, else it returns 0.0. The logical OR operator will return 1.0 if either of its arguments is non-zero, else it returns 0.0. The logical XOR operator will return 1.0 if one of its arguments is zero and the other non-zero, else it returns 0.0. The logical NOT operator returns 1.0 if its argument is 0.0, else it returns 0.0.

These relational and logical operators can be used as a masking or selection operation in a formula. For example, the number of atoms whose properties satisfy one or more criteria could be calculated by taking the returned per-atom vector of ones and zeroes and passing it to the compute reduce command.


Math Functions

Math functions are specified as keywords followed by one or more parenthesized arguments “x”, “y”, “z”, each of which can themselves be arbitrarily complex formulas. In this syntax, the arguments can represent scalar values or global vectors or per-atom vectors. In the latter case, the math operation is performed on each element of the vector. For example, “sqrt(natoms)” is the sqrt() of a scalar, where “sqrt(y*z)” yields a per-atom vector with each element being the sqrt() of the product of one atom’s y and z coordinates.

Most of the math functions perform obvious operations. The ln() is the natural log; log() is the base 10 log.

The random(x,y,z) function takes 3 arguments: x = lo, y = hi, and z = seed. It generates a uniform random number between lo and hi. The normal(x,y,z) function also takes 3 arguments: x = mu, y = sigma, and z = seed. It generates a Gaussian variate centered on mu with variance sigma^2. In both cases the seed is used the first time the internal random number generator is invoked, to initialize it. For equal-style and vector-style variables, every processor uses the same seed so that they each generate the same sequence of random numbers. For atom-style variables, a unique seed is created for each processor, based on the specified seed. This effectively generates a different random number for each atom being looped over in the atom-style variable.

Note

Internally, there is just one random number generator for all equal-style and vector-style variables and another one for all atom-style variables. If you define multiple variables (of each style) which use the random() or normal() math functions, then the internal random number generators will only be initialized once, which means only one of the specified seeds will determine the sequence of generated random numbers.

The ceil(), floor(), and round() functions are those in the C math library. Ceil() is the smallest integer not less than its argument. Floor() if the largest integer not greater than its argument. Round() is the nearest integer to its argument.

The ramp(x,y) function uses the current timestep to generate a value linearly interpolated between the specified x,y values over the course of a run, according to this formula:

value = x + (y-x) * (timestep-startstep) / (stopstep-startstep)

The run begins on startstep and ends on stopstep. Startstep and stopstep can span multiple runs, using the start and stop keywords of the run command. See the run command for details of how to do this.

The stagger(x,y) function uses the current timestep to generate a new timestep. X,y > 0 and x > y are required. The generated timesteps increase in a staggered fashion, as the sequence x,x+y,2x,2x+y,3x,3x+y,etc. For any current timestep, the next timestep in the sequence is returned. Thus if stagger(1000,100) is used in a variable by the dump_modify every command, it will generate the sequence of output timesteps:

The logfreq(x,y,z) function uses the current timestep to generate a new timestep. X,y,z > 0 and y < z are required. The generated timesteps are on a base-z logarithmic scale, starting with x, and the y value is how many of the z-1 possible timesteps within one logarithmic interval are generated. I.e. the timesteps follow the sequence x,2x,3x,…y*x,x*z,2x*z,3x*z,…y*x*z,x*z^2,2x*z^2,etc. For any current timestep, the next timestep in the sequence is returned. Thus if logfreq(100,4,10) is used in a variable by the dump_modify every command, it will generate this sequence of output timesteps:

The logfreq2(x,y,z) function is similar to logfreq, except a single logarithmic interval is divided into y equally-spaced timesteps and all of them are output. Y < z is not required. Thus, if logfreq2(100,18,10) is used in a variable by the dump_modify every command, then the interval between 100 and 1000 is divided as 900/18 = 50 steps, and it will generate the sequence of output timesteps:

The stride(x,y,z) function uses the current timestep to generate a new timestep. X,y >= 0 and z > 0 and x <= y are required. The generated timesteps increase in increments of z, from x to y, i.e. it generates the sequence x,x+z,x+2z,…,y. If y-x is not a multiple of z, then similar to the way a for loop operates, the last value will be one that does not exceed y. For any current timestep, the next timestep in the sequence is returned. Thus if stride(1000,2000,100) is used in a variable by the dump_modify every command, it will generate the sequence of output timesteps:

The stride2(x,y,z,a,b,c) function is similar to the stride() function except it generates two sets of strided timesteps, one at a coarser level and one at a finer level. Thus it is useful for debugging, e.g. to produce output every timestep at the point in simulation when a problem occurs. X,y >= 0 and z > 0 and x <= y are required, as are a,b >= 0 and c > 0 and a < b. Also, a >= x and b <= y are required so that the second stride is inside the first. The generated timesteps increase in increments of z, starting at x, until a is reached. At that point the timestep increases in increments of c, from a to b, then after b, increments by z are resumed until y is reached. For any current timestep, the next timestep in the sequence is returned. Thus if stride2(1000,2000,100,1350,1360,1) is used in a variable by the dump_modify every command, it will generate the sequence of output timesteps:

The vdisplace(x,y) function takes 2 arguments: x = value0 and y = velocity, and uses the elapsed time to change the value by a linear displacement due to the applied velocity over the course of a run, according to this formula:

value = value0 + velocity*(timestep-startstep)*dt

where dt = the timestep size.

The run begins on startstep. Startstep can span multiple runs, using the start keyword of the run command. See the run command for details of how to do this. Note that the thermo_style keyword elaplong = timestep-startstep.

The swiggle(x,y,z) and cwiggle(x,y,z) functions each take 3 arguments: x = value0, y = amplitude, z = period. They use the elapsed time to oscillate the value by a sin() or cos() function over the course of a run, according to one of these formulas, where omega = 2 PI / period:

value = value0 + Amplitude * sin(omega*(timestep-startstep)*dt) value = value0 + Amplitude * (1 - cos(omega*(timestep-startstep)*dt))

where dt = the timestep size.

The run begins on startstep. Startstep can span multiple runs, using the start keyword of the run command. See the run command for details of how to do this. Note that the thermo_style keyword elaplong = timestep-startstep.

100,1000,1100,2000,2100,3000,etc
100,200,300,400,1000,2000,3000,4000,10000,20000,etc
100,150,200,...950,1000,1500,2000,...9500,10000,15000,etc
1000,1100,1200,...,1900,2000
1000,1100,1200,1300,1350,1351,1352,...1359,1360,1400,1500,...,2000

Group and Region Functions

Group functions are specified as keywords followed by one or two parenthesized arguments. The first argument ID is the group-ID. The dim argument, if it exists, is x or y or z. The dir argument, if it exists, is xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax, zmin, or zmax. The dimdim argument, if it exists, is xx or yy or zz or xy or yz or xz.

The group function count() is the number of atoms in the group. The group functions mass() and charge() are the total mass and charge of the group. Xcm() and vcm() return components of the position and velocity of the center of mass of the group. Fcm() returns a component of the total force on the group of atoms. Bound() returns the min/max of a particular coordinate for all atoms in the group. Gyration() computes the radius-of-gyration of the group of atoms. See the compute gyration command for a definition of the formula. Angmom() returns components of the angular momentum of the group of atoms around its center of mass. Torque() returns components of the torque on the group of atoms around its center of mass, based on current forces on the atoms. Inertia() returns one of 6 components of the symmetric inertia tensor of the group of atoms around its center of mass, ordered as Ixx,Iyy,Izz,Ixy,Iyz,Ixz. Omega() returns components of the angular velocity of the group of atoms around its center of mass.

Region functions are specified exactly the same way as group functions except they take an extra final argument IDR which is the region ID. The function is computed for all atoms that are in both the group and the region. If the group is “all”, then the only criteria for atom inclusion is that it be in the region.


Special Functions

Special functions take specific kinds of arguments, meaning their arguments cannot be formulas themselves.

The sum(x), min(x), max(x), ave(x), trap(x), and slope(x) functions each take 1 argument which is of the form “c_ID” or “c_ID73” or “f_ID” or “f_ID73” or “v_name”. The first two are computes and the second two are fixes; the ID in the reference should be replaced by the ID of a compute or fix defined elsewhere in the input script. The compute or fix must produce either a global vector or array. If it produces a global vector, then the notation without “73” should be used. If it produces a global array, then the notation with “73” should be used, when N is an integer, to specify which column of the global array is being referenced. The last form of argument “v_name” is for a vector-style variable where “name” is replaced by the name of the variable.

These functions operate on a global vector of inputs and reduce it to a single scalar value. This is analogous to the operation of the compute reduce command, which performs similar operations on per-atom and local vectors.

The sum() function calculates the sum of all the vector elements. The min() and max() functions find the minimum and maximum element respectively. The ave() function is the same as sum() except that it divides the result by the length of the vector.

The trap() function is the same as sum() except the first and last elements are multiplied by a weighting factor of 1/2 when performing the sum. This effectively implements an integration via the trapezoidal rule on the global vector of data. I.e. consider a set of points, equally spaced by 1 in their x coordinate: (1,V1), (2,V2), …, (N,VN), where the Vi are the values in the global vector of length N. The integral from 1 to N of these points is trap(). When appropriately normalized by the timestep size, this function is useful for calculating integrals of time-series data, like that generated by the fix ave/correlate command.

The slope() function uses linear regression to fit a line to the set of points, equally spaced by 1 in their x coordinate: (1,V1), (2,V2), …, (N,VN), where the Vi are the values in the global vector of length N. The returned value is the slope of the line. If the line has a single point or is vertical, it returns 1.0e20.

The gmask(x) function takes 1 argument which is a group ID. It can only be used in atom-style variables. It returns a 1 for atoms that are in the group, and a 0 for atoms that are not.

The rmask(x) function takes 1 argument which is a region ID. It can only be used in atom-style variables. It returns a 1 for atoms that are in the geometric region, and a 0 for atoms that are not.

The grmask(x,y) function takes 2 arguments. The first is a group ID, and the second is a region ID. It can only be used in atom-style variables. It returns a 1 for atoms that are in both the group and region, and a 0 for atoms that are not in both.

The next(x) function takes 1 argument which is a variable ID (not “v_foo”, just “foo”). It must be for a file-style or atomfile-style variable. Each time the next() function is invoked (i.e. each time the equal-style or atom-style variable is evaluated), the following steps occur.

For file-style variables, the current string value stored by the file-style variable is converted to a numeric value and returned by the function. And the next string value in the file is read and stored. Note that if the line previously read from the file was not a numeric string, then it will typically evaluate to 0.0, which is likely not what you want.

For atomfile-style variables, the current per-atom values stored by the atomfile-style variable are returned by the function. And the next set of per-atom values in the file is read and stored.

Since file-style and atomfile-style variables read and store the first line of the file or first set of per-atoms values when they are defined in the input script, these are the value(s) that will be returned the first time the next() function is invoked. If next() is invoked more times than there are lines or sets of lines in the file, the variable is deleted, similar to how the next command operates.


Feature Functions

Feature functions allow to probe the running LAMMPS executable for whether specific features are either active, defined, or available. The functions take two arguments, a category and a corresponding argument. The arguments are strings thus cannot be formulas themselves (only $-style immediate variable expansion is possible). Return value is either 1.0 or 0.0 depending on whether the function evaluates to true or false, respectively.

The is_active() function allows to query for active settings which are grouped by categories. Currently supported categories and arguments are:

  • package (argument = cuda or gpu or intel or kokkos or omp)
  • newton (argument = pair or bond or any)
  • pair (argument = single or respa or manybody or tail or shift)
  • comm_style (argument = brick or tiled)
  • min_style (argument = any of the compiled in minimizer styles)
  • run_style (argument = any of the compiled in run styles)
  • atom_style (argument = any of the compiled in atom styles)
  • pair_style (argument = any of the compiled in pair styles)
  • bond_style (argument = any of the compiled in bond styles)
  • angle_style (argument = any of the compiled in angle styles)
  • dihedral_style (argument = any of the compiled in dihedral styles)
  • improper_style (argument = any of the compiled in improper styles)
  • kspace_style (argument = any of the compiled in kspace styles)

Most of the settings are self-explanatory, the single argument in the pair category allows to check whether a pair style supports a Pair::single() function as needed by compute group/group and others features or LAMMPS, respa allows to check whether the inner/middle/outer mode of r-RESPA is supported. In the various style categories, the checking is also done using suffix flags, if available and enabled.

Example 1: disable use of suffix for pppm when using GPU package (i.e. run it on the CPU concurrently to running the pair style on the GPU), but do use the suffix otherwise (e.g. with USER-OMP).

Example 2: use r-RESPA with inner/outer cutoff, if supported by pair style, otherwise fall back to using pair and reducing the outer time step

timestep $(2.0*(1.0+*is_active(pair,respa)) if $(is_active(pair,respa)) then "run_style respa 4 3 2 2 improper 1 inner 2 5.5 7.0 outer 3 kspace 4" else "run_style respa 3 3 2 improper 1 pair 2 kspace 3"

The is_defined() function allows to query categories like compute, dump, fix, group, region, and variable whether an entry with the provided name or id is defined.

The is_available(category,name) function allows to query whether a specific optional feature is available, i.e. compiled in. This currently works for the following categories: command, compute, fix, pair_style and feature. For all categories except command and feature also appending active suffixes is tried before reporting failure.

The feature category is used to check the availability of compiled in features such as GZIP support, PNG support, JPEG support, FFMPEG support, and C++ exceptions for error handling. Corresponding values for name are gzip, png, jpeg, ffmpeg and exceptions.

This enables writing input scripts which only dump using a given format if the compiled binary supports it.

pair_style lj/cut/coul/long 14.0 if $(is_active(package,gpu)) then "suffix off" kspace_style pppm
if"$(is_available(feature,png))"then"print 'PNG supported'"else"print 'PNG not supported'"if"$(is_available(feature,ffmpeg)"then"dump 3 all movie 25 movie.mp4 type type zoom 1.6 adiam 1.0"

Atom Values and Vectors

Atom values take an integer argument I from 1 to N, where I is the atom-ID, e.g. x[243], which means use the x coordinate of the atom with ID = 243. Or they can take a variable name, specified as v_name, where name is the name of the variable, like x[v_myIndex]. The variable can be of any style except vector or atom or atomfile variables. The variable is evaluated and the result is expected to be numeric and is cast to an integer (i.e. 3.4 becomes 3), to use an an index, which must be a value from 1 to N. Note that a “formula” cannot be used as the argument between the brackets, e.g. x[243+10] or x[v_myIndex+1] are not allowed. To do this a single variable can be defined that contains the needed formula.

Note that the 0 < atom-ID <= N, where N is the largest atom ID in the system. If an ID is specified for an atom that does not currently exist, then the generated value is 0.0.

Atom vectors generate one value per atom, so that a reference like “vx” means the x-component of each atom’s velocity will be used when evaluating the variable.

The meaning of the different atom values and vectors is mostly self-explanatory. Mol refers to the molecule ID of an atom, and is only defined if an atom_style is being used that defines molecule IDs.

Note that many other atom attributes can be used as inputs to a variable by using the compute property/atom command and then specifying a quantity from that compute.


Compute References

Compute references access quantities calculated by a compute. The ID in the reference should be replaced by the ID of a compute defined elsewhere in the input script. As discussed in the doc page for the compute command, computes can produce global, per-atom, or local values. Only global and per-atom values can be used in a variable. Computes can also produce a scalar, vector, or array.

An equal-style variable can only use scalar values, which means a global scalar, or an element of a global or per-atom vector or array. A vector-style variable can use scalar values or a global vector of values, or a column of a global array of values. Atom-style variables can use global scalar values. They can also use per-atom vector values, or a column of a per-atom array. See the doc pages for individual computes to see what kind of values they produce.

Examples of different kinds of compute references are as follows. There is typically no ambiguity (see exception below) as to what a reference means, since computes only produce either global or per-atom quantities, never both.

c_IDglobal scalar, or per-atom vector
c_ID[I]Ith element of global vector, or atom I’s value in per-atom vector, or Ith column from per-atom array
c_ID[I][J]I,J element of global array, or atom I’s Jth value in per-atom array

For I and J indices, integers can be specified or a variable name, specified as v_name, where name is the name of the variable. The rules for this syntax are the same as for the “Atom Values and Vectors” discussion above.

One source of ambiguity for compute references is when a vector-style variable refers to a compute that produces both a global scalar and a global vector. Consider a compute with ID “foo” that does this, referenced as follows by variable “a”, where “myVec” is another vector-style variable:

variable a vector c_foo*v_myVec

The reference “c_foo” could refer to either the global scalar or global vector produced by compute “foo”. In this case, “c_foo” will always refer to the global scalar, and “C_foo” can be used to reference the global vector. Similarly if the compute produces both a global vector and global array, then “c_foo[I]” will always refer to an element of the global vector, and “C_foo[I]” can be used to reference the Ith column of the global array.

Note that if a variable containing a compute is evaluated directly in an input script (not during a run), then the values accessed by the compute must be current. See the discussion below about “Variable Accuracy”.


Fix References

Fix references access quantities calculated by a fix. The ID in the reference should be replaced by the ID of a fix defined elsewhere in the input script. As discussed in the doc page for the fix command, fixes can produce global, per-atom, or local values. Only global and per-atom values can be used in a variable. Fixes can also produce a scalar, vector, or array. An equal-style variable can only use scalar values, which means a global scalar, or an element of a global or per-atom vector or array. Atom-style variables can use the same scalar values. They can also use per-atom vector values. A vector value can be a per-atom vector itself, or a column of an per-atom array. See the doc pages for individual fixes to see what kind of values they produce.

The different kinds of fix references are exactly the same as the compute references listed in the above table, where “c_” is replaced by “f_”. Again, there is typically no ambiguity (see exception below) as to what a reference means, since fixes only produce either global or per-atom quantities, never both.

f_IDglobal scalar, or per-atom vector
f_ID[I]Ith element of global vector, or atom I’s value in per-atom vector, or Ith column from per-atom array
f_ID[I][J]I,J element of global array, or atom I’s Jth value in per-atom array

For I and J indices, integers can be specified or a variable name, specified as v_name, where name is the name of the variable. The rules for this syntax are the same as for the “Atom Values and Vectors” discussion above.

One source of ambiguity for fix references is the same ambiguity discussed for compute references above. Namely when a vector-style variable refers to a fix that produces both a global scalar and a global vector. The solution is the same as for compute references. For a fix with ID “foo”, “f_foo” will always refer to the global scalar, and “F_foo” can be used to reference the global vector. And similarly for distinguishing between a fix’s global vector versus global array with “f_foo[I]” versus “F_foo[I]”.

Note that if a variable containing a fix is evaluated directly in an input script (not during a run), then the values accessed by the fix should be current. See the discussion below about “Variable Accuracy”.

Note that some fixes only generate quantities on certain timesteps. If a variable attempts to access the fix on non-allowed timesteps, an error is generated. For example, the fix ave/time command may only generate averaged quantities every 100 steps. See the doc pages for individual fix commands for details.


Variable References

Variable references access quantities stored or calculated by other variables, which will cause those variables to be evaluated. The name in the reference should be replaced by the name of a variable defined elsewhere in the input script.

As discussed on this doc page, equal-style variables generate a single global numeric value, vector-style variables generate a vector of global numeric values, and atom-style and atomfile-style variables generate a per-atom vector of numeric values. All other variables store one or more strings.

The formula for an equal-style variable can use any style of variable including a vector_style or atom-style or atomfile-style. For these 3 styles, a subscript must be used to access a single value from the vector-, atom-, or atomfile-style variable. If a string-storing variable is used, the string is converted to a numeric value. Note that this will typically produce a 0.0 if the string is not a numeric string, which is likely not what you want.

The formula for a vector-style variable can use any style of variable, including atom-style or atomfile-style variables. For these 2 styles, a subscript must be used to access a single value from the atom-, or atomfile-style variable.

The formula for an atom-style variable can use any style of variable, including other atom-style or atomfile-style variables. If it uses a vector-style variable, a subscript must be used to access a single value from the vector-style variable.

Examples of different kinds of variable references are as follows. There is no ambiguity as to what a reference means, since variables produce only a global scalar or global vector or per-atom vector.

v_nameglobal scalar from equal-style variable
v_nameglobal vector from vector-style variable
v_nameper-atom vector from atom-style or atomfile-style variable
v_name[I]Ith element of a global vector from vector-style variable
v_name[I]value of atom with ID = I from atom-style or atomfile-style variable

For the I index, an integer can be specified or a variable name, specified as v_name, where name is the name of the variable. The rules for this syntax are the same as for the “Atom Values and Vectors” discussion above.


Immediate Evaluation of Variables:

If you want an equal-style variable to be evaluated immediately, it may be the case that you do not need to define a variable at all. See Section 3.2 of the manual, which describes the use of “immediate” variables in an input script, specified as $(formula) with parenthesis, where the formula has the same syntax as equal-style variables described on this page. This effectively evaluates a formula immediately without using the variable command to define a named variable.

More generally, there is a difference between referencing a variable with a leading $ sign (e.g. $x or ${abc}) versus with a leading “v_” (e.g. v_x or v_abc). The former can be used in any input script command, including a variable command. The input script parser evaluates the reference variable immediately and substitutes its value into the command. As explained in Section 3.2 for “Parsing rules”, you can also use un-named “immediate” variables for this purpose. For example, a string like this $((xlo+xhi)/2+sqrt(v_area)) in an input script command evaluates the string between the parenthesis as an equal-style variable formula.

Referencing a variable with a leading “v_” is an optional or required kind of argument for some commands (e.g. the fix ave/chunk or dump custom or thermo_style commands) if you wish it to evaluate a variable periodically during a run. It can also be used in a variable formula if you wish to reference a second variable. The second variable will be evaluated whenever the first variable is evaluated.

As an example, suppose you use this command in your input script to define the variable “v” as

before a run where the simulation box size changes. You might think this will assign the initial volume to the variable “v”. That is not the case. Rather it assigns a formula which evaluates the volume (using the thermo_style keyword “vol”) to the variable “v”. If you use the variable “v” in some other command like fix ave/time then the current volume of the box will be evaluated continuously during the run.

If you want to store the initial volume of the system, you can do it this way:

The second command will force “v” to be evaluated (yielding the initial volume) and assign that value to the variable “v0”. Thus the command

would print out both the current and initial volume periodically during the run.

Note that it is a mistake to enclose a variable formula in double quotes if it contains variables preceded by $ signs. For example,

This is because the quotes prevent variable substitution (see this section on parsing input script commands), and thus an error will occur when the formula for “vratio” is evaluated later.


Variable Accuracy:

Obviously, LAMMPS attempts to evaluate variables containing formulas (equal and atom style variables) accurately whenever the evaluation is performed. Depending on what is included in the formula, this may require invoking a compute, either directly or indirectly via a thermo keyword, or accessing a value previously calculated by a compute, or accessing a value calculated and stored by a fix. If the compute is one that calculates the pressure or energy of the system, then these quantities need to be tallied during the evaluation of the interatomic potentials (pair, bond, etc) on timesteps that the variable will need the values.

LAMMPS keeps track of all of this during a run or energy minimization. An error will be generated if you attempt to evaluate a variable on timesteps when it cannot produce accurate values. For example, if a thermo_style custom command prints a variable which accesses values stored by a fix ave/time command and the timesteps on which thermo output is generated are not multiples of the averaging frequency used in the fix command, then an error will occur.

An input script can also request variables be evaluated before or after or in between runs, e.g. by including them in a print command. In this case, if a compute is needed to evaluate a variable (either directly or indirectly), LAMMPS will not invoke the compute, but it will use a value previously calculated by the compute, and can do this only if it was invoked on the current timestep. Fixes will always provide a quantity needed by a variable, but the quantity may or may not be current. This leads to one of three kinds of behavior:

(1) The variable may be evaluated accurately. If it contains references to a compute or fix, and these values were calculated on the last timestep of a preceding run, then they will be accessed and used by the variable and the result will be accurate.

(2) LAMMPS may not be able to evaluate the variable and will generate an error message stating so. For example, if the variable requires a quantity from a compute that has not been invoked on the current timestep, LAMMPS will generate an error. This means, for example, that such a variable cannot be evaluated before the first run has occurred. Likewise, in between runs, a variable containing a compute cannot be evaluated unless the compute was invoked on the last timestep of the preceding run, e.g. by thermodynamic output.

One way to get around this problem is to perform a 0-timestep run before using the variable. For example, these commands

will generate an error if the run is the first run specified in the input script, because generating a value for the “t” variable requires a compute for calculating the temperature to be invoked.

However, this sequence of commands would be fine:

The 0-timestep run initializes and invokes various computes, including the one for temperature, so that the value it stores is current and can be accessed by the variable “t” after the run has completed. Note that a 0-timestep run does not alter the state of the system, so it does not change the input state for the 1000-timestep run that follows. Also note that the 0-timestep run must actually use and invoke the compute in question (e.g. via thermo or dump output) in order for it to enable the compute to be used in a variable after the run. Thus if you are trying to print a variable that uses a compute you have defined, you can insure it is invoked on the last timestep of the preceding run by including it in thermodynamic output.

Unlike computes, fixes will never generate an error if their values are accessed by a variable in between runs. They always return some value to the variable. However, the value may not be what you expect if the fix has not yet calculated the quantity of interest or it is not current. For example, the fix indent command stores the force on the indenter. But this is not computed until a run is performed. Thus if a variable attempts to print this value before the first run, zeroes will be output. Again, performing a 0-timestep run before printing the variable has the desired effect.

(3) The variable may be evaluated incorrectly and LAMMPS may have no way to detect this has occurred. Consider the following sequence of commands:

The first run is performed using one setting for the pairwise potential defined by the pair_style and pair_coeff commands. The potential energy is evaluated on the final timestep and stored by the compute pe compute (this is done by the thermo_style command). Then a pair coefficient is changed, altering the potential energy of the system. When the potential energy is printed via the “e” variable, LAMMPS will use the potential energy value stored by the compute pe compute, thinking it is current. There are many other commands which could alter the state of the system between runs, causing a variable to evaluate incorrectly.

The solution to this issue is the same as for case (2) above, namely perform a 0-timestep run before the variable is evaluated to insure the system is up-to-date. For example, this sequence of commands would print a potential energy that reflected the changed pairwise coefficient:

variable v equal vol variable v0 equal $v
thermo_stylecustomstepv_vv_v0
variablevratioequal"${vfinal}/${v0}"
variabletequaltempprint"Initial temperature = $t"run1000
run0variabletequaltempprint"Initial temperature = $t"run1000
pair_coeff111.01.0run1000pair_coeff111.51.0variableeequalpeprint"Final potential energy = $e"
labelloopvariablealoop5print"A = $a"if"$a > 2"then"jump in.script break"nextajumpin.scriptlooplabelbreakvariableadelete
variablefoopythonmyMultiplypythonmyMultiplyreturnv_fooformatffilefuncs.py

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