Essays On 1984 Totalitarianism

"1984" By George Orwell: Dangers Of A Totalitarian Government

"1984", by George Orwell, is a novel about a man named Winston Smith who lives in London, which is a part of the country Oceania. The world is a totalitarian society that is led by Big Brother, which censors everyone's behavior, and even their thoughts. Big brother is on posters everywhere, "BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU." Big brother is a creation of the party.

Winston is completely unhappy with his life and he secretly wants to join a supposed group of underground rebels who intend on overthrowing the government. Winston commits a very serious "thought crime" of writing his feelings he has about Big Brother in a diary. This is a very serious thought crime in that it may result in arrest or worse, abolishment. Your life and anything you have ever done was wiped out, your one time existence was denied and then forgotten.

Throughout the book, Winston continues to hate Big Brother and all of its ways. He meets Julia, and since feels the same about Big Brother as Winston does, they commit the crime of love. Winston also meets O'Brien, an inner party member, who exchanges glances with Winston giving him hopes and dreams that he is a member of the Brotherhood. However, Winston is soon trapped by O'Brien.

Winston and Julia are sent to the Ministry of Love which is a rehabilitation center for criminals accused of a thought crime. There, Winston is separated from Julia and tortured until his beliefs coincided with those of the Party. Winston denounces everything he ever believed in,...

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Totalitarian Society in George Orwell´s 1984

1677 words - 7 pages Although the internet has been one humanities most important and groundbreaking inventions, it creates a totalitarian society. With the internet comes the ability to tap into an infinite net of knowledge that is available to anyone with a device that can connect to it. However, with these vast benefits also come grave dangers. The internet poses a large threat to individual privacy and freedom of expression that has existed in the United States...

1984 by George Orwell. Essay

1197 words - 5 pages George Orwell, whose real name was Eric Arthur Blair, was born on June 25, 1903 in Motihari India to Richard and Ida Blair. Orwell and his mother moved back to England so Orwell could grow up according to the Anglo-Indian custom. In his lifetime, Orwell attended several schools, but decided not to continue his education in 1921. Therefore, Orwell went to work for the...

1984, by George Orwell

1070 words - 4 pages It is feasible that in the future machines may be more powerful than man, to such an extent that machines control mankind, mechanizing human life. This is seen in Kurt Vonnegut’s Player Piano, a post-World War III society in which machines are more powerful than mankind (Ponniah 229).The Technology in 1984, by George Orwell, has a similar influence. 1984 portrays a totalitarian society, powered by the icon of Big Brother. Big Brother and his...

1984 By George Orwell

1955 words - 8 pages Things to know: 1984 was a book written about life under a totalitarian regime from an average citizen’s point of view. This book envisions the theme of an all knowing government with strong control over its citizens. This book tells the story of Winston Smith, a worker of the Ministry of Truth, who is in charge of editing the truth to fit the government’s policies and claims. It shows the future of a government bleeding with brute force and...

1984, by George Orwell.

1829 words - 7 pages George Orwell's dystopian (a fictional place where people lead dehumanized and fearful lives) vision of the year 1984, as depicted in what many consider to be his greatest novel, has entered the collective consciousness of the English-speaking world more completely than perhaps any other political text, whether fiction or nonfiction. No matter how far our contemporary world may seem from 1984's Oceania, any suggestion of government...

"1984" by George Orwell.

3723 words - 15 pages Author:The book Nineteen Eighty-four by George Orwell was written in 1948 and published in 1949. It is one of Orwell´s most famous books.Eric Arthur Blair (George Orwell) was born in 1903 in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. The family moved to England in 1907 and in 1917 Orwell entered Eton, where he contributed regularly to the various college magazines. From 1922 to 1927 he served with the Indian...

"1984" by George Orwell.

1337 words - 5 pages METHODS OF CONTROL===========================================================In the novel Nineteen Eighty-four by George Orwell there is a system of controlling by manipulating the...

Korean Totalitarian Government of 1984

2080 words - 8 pages As evident through the striking similarities between the totalitarian government of 1984 and the Communist regime of North Korea, it really is as if Kim Il Sung obtained an early copy of George Orwell’s 1984 and used it as a blueprint for his system (Hitchens n.p.). George Orwell had been exposed to various types of imperialism throughout his early life, leading to a realization of his resentment for authority. Orwell produced the novel with the...

1984 a Novel by George Orwell

2244 words - 9 pages In the novel 1984, George Orwell demonstrates a loss of privacy in Oceania caused by Big Brother. The relevance of this novel to today’s society is how the people of America are losing their personal privacy every moment of the day without even noticing their rights to freedom being lost. The US citizens have lost their freedom to their financials, choices of personal body use, and the ability to express themselves freely in everyday activities....

Government Control, No Freedom in 1984 by George Orwell

1094 words - 4 pages People hear about political issues all over the news and form their own opinions on them, but are they really deciding beliefs for themselves or are they just believing whatever the media tells them? Because of the modern day media biased, many people do not think independently, even when they think they are. They merely believe the lies the media feeds them and do not research the matter themselves to get an accurate idea of what is truly going...

Government Control and Privacy Issues in 1984 by George Orwell

1709 words - 7 pages Today’s modern world may not be exactly like 1984, but there are some issues that are very similar to it. Some of the biggest issues that is becoming compromised today is the issue of privacy, which in the book 1984 was something that the people did not have much of because of things like telescreens. Not only is our privacy compromised but the government is also being too controlling. Ways today’s privacy is being compromised are through things...

Orwell’s Totalitarian Government in 1984 Essay

1562 Words7 Pages

George Orwell’s key objective throughout his novel, 1984, was to convey to his readers the imminent threat of the severe danger that totalitarianism could mean for the world. Orwell takes great measures to display the horrifying effects that come along with complete and dominant control that actually comes along with totalitarian government. In Orwell’s novel, personal liberties and individual freedoms that are protected and granted to many Americans today, are taken away and ripped from the citizen’s lives. The government takes away freedom and rights from the people so that the ruling class (which makes up the government), while reign with complete supremacy and possess all power. George Orwell declared himself as a Socialist, and he…show more content…

Using his remarkable writing skills, Orwell published 1984 in hopes that he would be able to demonstrate to his readers that a communist government would lead to a totalitarian reign over all of society.
In Orwell’s novel he creates a fictional society in which the government rules all the people and holds complete power over everyone. The government is referred to as ‘The Party’ and they depict themselves and flawless, generous, and so very helpful to all of mankind. They feed the people lies and tell them that without them (The Party), the citizens would be hopeless and could not possibly survive. The government holds onto their widespread power by instilling fear upon all citizens. They openly let the people know that they have spies hidden everywhere, and they have various technological devices that will ensure that every person is acting exactly how the government wants them to. For example, the ‘telescreen’ was a device that was mandatory in every citizen’s house and was installed by the government. It was basically a video recorder that could watch a person’s every move, as well as read off important news from the government rulers. The main character in Orwell’s novel, Winston Smith, expresses his thoughts about the telescreen by realizing that “at any rate they could plug in your wire whenever they wanted to. You had to live -- did live, from habit that became instinct -- in the assumption that every sound you made was overheard, and,

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